Forum Posts

Dawn Luedecke
Sep 10, 2019
In Lesson 4: Officers
Many people think Coast Guard Investigators are similar to what they see on NCIS. However, that is inaccurate. Think of them more as Internal Affairs at a police department. The Coast Guard website (https://www.uscg.mil/Units/Coast-Guard-Investigative-Service/) says that: "This authority provides for Coast Guard special agents to conduct investigations of actual, alleged or suspected criminal activity; carry firearms; execute and serve warrants; and make arrests." While this is true, their main focus is on crimes committed by Coast Guardsman, liaison operations with other law enforcement agencies, and information collection. CGI is in a chain of command separate from that of the rest of the Coast Guard so the they can be unbiased. CGI consists of both officers and civilians, and are trained at the same Federal Law Enforcement school where Boarding Officers are trained. Boarding Officers and Boarding Team members, consisting primarily of enlisted personnel, are the ones who do the 'missions' and law enforcement operations out on the water. The website says that CGI perform missions such as: Criminal Investigations for Crimes Relating to the Maritime Realm and Coast Guard missions Law Enforcement Task Force & Liaison Operations Investigations into Felony Violations of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) Protective Services Operations Law Enforcement information collection This means that they are the middle men for our Joint Task Force operations with other federal agencies, Investigate Coast Guardsman related crimes, and collect information. Protective service operations are typically performed by any qualified law enforcement agents in the Coast Guard as well as CGI. For instance, when I was stationed on the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca, we had a mission to stand guard for the President while he was doing a speech at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut. My job was to man the guns on the cutter, but my GM1's job was to go with the Secret Service to protect the President on the base. Protective Services are typically performed on politicians or high profile personnel. I once met a CGI agent and chatted with him for a while. When I asked if they ever went on boats to investigate Coast Guardsman he said, "Occasionally we'll come for interviews and such, but if we need someone to go undercover on a boat we bring someone over from the Navy." Here are a few cases I know about that were performed by CGI: A recruit reported that his Company Commander (drill instructor) threatened to kill him. CGI interviewed CC, recruit, other CCs, and other recruits and found the story to be fabricated by the recruit, and the Company Commander to be innocent. Someone stole money from the safe on a cutter. CGI came onboard to do interviews and investigate. Found the guilty party and had them brought to land where CGI had them arrested by the local police department. CGI investigated a case where two Coast Guardsman were found to be involved in a multi state, drug smuggling ring with an Air Marshall. They were all arrested by local and federal authorities. Recently, a Coast Guardsman was found dead on a beach during a port call. CGI investigated and discovered that another Coast Guardsman had gotten into an altercation with him and then lied to command about the injuries on his hands. Cause of death was blunt force trauma. So keep in mind while writing that the majority of the investigating that CGI does is internally, and from their offices. It would not be accurate to have your hero/heroine be a CGI agent and be performing any sort of mission out at sea. CGI offices are land based, and they are not trained on boat, ship, or helicopter operations.
0
0
9
Dawn Luedecke
Aug 10, 2018
In LSN 18-Stations
The backbone to the Coast Guards search and rescue efforts are not only the cutter mentioned previously in the course, but Stations and Air Stations alike. Take for instance the devastating results of Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Harvey. Both left people stranded in homes brimming with water. One of the first responders for these events were the Coast Guard; both Stations and Air Stations. Stations Coast Guard stations are manned by a crew of approximately 30, divided up into two duty sections. The duty rotations for these units typically, but not always, have what’s called a Port and Starboard duty rotation. Meaning two days on, two days off, and then every other weekend. This ensures that there is always someone at the unit who is refreshed and can respond to emergencies. NOTE: A Port and Starboard duty rotation at a station is the above schedule, however, at any other unit in the Coast Guard, a Port and Starboard duty rotation means one day on and one day off consecutively. A station is the only type of unit that uses the above Port and Starboard rotation style. Stations require their on-duty, duty section to remain at the base. The base has sleeping quarters, a Galley and Mess Deck, a lounge, laundry facility, and sometimes even a gym. A typical work day is from 6am to 10pm. Meaning they are only allowed to go to sleep after 10pm and they wake up at 6am. However, they do have downtime at night, and during meals. Other than that, they are doing maintenance on the buildings, grounds, or boats. Doing training, or out on Search and Rescue or Law Enforcement missions. As stated previously, when a mariner is in trouble, they will send a message over the radio on Channel 16 or their emergency beacon will go off alerting the nearest station. The boat crew of the duty section will then gear up in the appropriate equipment for the mission, brief with the watchstander and OOD, and then head out to the location. The person on watch and the Officer of the Day (OOD) will stay behind to man the radio, communicate with Sector and make command decisions for the boat crew. Once the boat crew returns, they will debrief with the watchstander and OOD, and then the OOD will debrief Sector. If, however, the boat crew brings back survivors, they will first meet family members of the survivor or an ambulance (that the OOD called to the base) and hand the survivors over to them. If they bring back a wanted felon, they would meet with the appropriate law enforcement agency to hand over the suspect before debriefing. Here is a quick video showing a rescue with a good outcome. The helicopter rescue at the end is from this same incident as the man plucked from the water by a nearby vessel and Coast Guard small boat. Air Stations An Air Stations duty section and duty rotation depend on the type of unit and location. For instance, an Air Station with only three Dolphin helicopters would have a smaller duty rotation than an Air Station with helicopters and planes. Air Stations work with Stations and Cutters alike to perform rescues at sea. If Sector deems it necessary, the Air Station will launch the appropriate helicopter or plane for the mission. Take for example Hurricane Harvey. During that catastrophe (while all available land unit personnel were performing small boat or personal rescues) all helicopters within flight distance were launched for roof top rescues. Air Stations as far as North Carolina were sending airplanes to Houston with rescue and survival supplies. During the time, all available Coast Guard resources were launched. Like Stations, flight crews on duty will stay in what’s called ‘on-call duty rooms.’ They will sleep at the base, ready to take off within minutes of a rescue call comes in. When they launch, they will fly to the location, and determine the best way to rescue the survivors. Whether it is picking the survivors up via basket from the Stations small boat, and flying them to land or hospital, or deploying a rescue swimmer to go into the water and pluck the survivors out one-by-one: either harnessed to the swimmer or placed in a rescue basket and hoisted into the helicopter. Many times, helicopters will get to a sailor in need before the station's boats, or work in conjunction with the small boats. Here is a picture showing every Air Station in the United States Coast Guard. This is a good resource to use when determining which Air Station would deploy to help your hero or heroine, and which aviation resources they have available at that station. Thank you so much for joining me in the Coast Guard class. Please feel free to email me at d_luedecke@yahoo.com with any questions you have regarding the Coast Guard. Cheers, Dawn Luedecke
Stations and Air Stations content media
0
0
12
Dawn Luedecke
Aug 08, 2018
In LSN 17: NESU and ATON
NESU/ATON For land billets, there are two maintenance units that help the Coast Guard to function. NESU and ANT. NESU NESU stands for Navel Engineering Support Unit. Here, Coasties perform intermediate maintenance on ships and boats for the local operational units. Without the NESU, a Cutter wouldn’t be able to sail. Casualties, or mechanical/engine problems, happen quite frequently on a cutter as the majority of these ships are old and frequently use recycled parts. When something breaks down that the ship’s crew cannot figure out, they call in the NESU to help. Think of them as in intermediate maintenance. If the NESU can’t figure it out, then they call in expert help from a unit on the east coast who specializes in maintenance. NESU can be comprised of two or three divisions, depending on the needs of the location: The Weapons Augmentations teams (WAT), Maintenance Augmentations team (MAT), and the Industrial Production Facility. Not only do Coast Guardsman work at the NESU, but many times these units will also employe skilled civilian tradesman in order to perform the maintenance needed to fix the boats and ships, and get them operational again. Here are the basic jobs for each department:     ▪    MAT Capabilities:     ▪    Gauge and Meter Calibrations     ▪    Thermographic Inspections     ▪    Depot Level PMS (Preventive Maintenance Service) on all D8 WLR/WLICs WAT Capabilities: Perform Intermediate maintenance on weapons systems Depot level PMS (Preventive Maintenance Service) weapons systems Inspect Weapons systems     ▪    IPF Capabilities:     ▪    Dockside 175 ft WLM Z-Drive Replacement     ▪    87 ft W-6 MTU Overhaul Facility     ▪    50 Ton Travel Lift     ▪    HVAC Repair     ▪    Blast and Paint Booth Facility     ▪    Full-Service Buoy & ATON Support Depot     ▪    ATON Dayboard Fabrication     ▪    Carpentry     ▪    Full-service engine repair Aids To Navigation Team (ATON) The ATON (or ANT team for short) is an essential part of the Search and Rescue efforts out on the water. ANT teams maintain the navigational tools used by Coast Guardsman and mariners alike. From buoys and markers to lighthouses, there job is to ensure the basic tools are functional for mariners to navigate the waterways safely. Although stationed on land, they have tug-like boats used to bring buoys back to base to clean and maintenance. As mentioned in a previous lesson during the full class, the Coast Guard is comprised of three organizations that came together in 1790 to form what we now know as the Coast Guard: The Life Saving Service The Lighthouse Service The Revenue Cutter Service Today, ATON teams still maintain the lighthouses that have not become museums or private lighthouses. While we no longer have government supported lighthouse keepers who live at and maintain these beacons, they are still in use today for sailors. However, they are remotely activated and maintenance by ATON, or another Coast Guard facility. Take for instance the Alaskan lighthouse, Cape Hitchinbrook. This island lighthouse was once the home of keepers who lived secluded on a bear-riddled Alaskan island. Today, the Alaskan Coast Guard flies out to the island via helicopter in order to perform maintenance, and keep it running. While stationed in Alaska, my husband frequently had to take Coast Guard or civilian helicopters to the island in order to fix the generators at the beacon. These trips were so dangerous and uncertain that each time he had to take a survival pack in case the weather changed and the helicopter couldn’t reach the island to pick him up, or in case a bear attacked while he was working. He had to be prepared for up to a weeks worth of stay. While he had many close calls with having to stay because of weather, he luckily always made it home by nightfall without injury. However, most lighthouse maintenance is as simple as driving a boat out to it to fix. These beacons are still very important for the safety and well being of mariners out on the ocean. Without these, the Coast Guard would perform many more Search and Rescue cases each year. Tomorrow is our last class, and we will learn about the backbone of the Search and Rescue: Stations and Air Stations. Today I would like to preemptively thank you for joining me in this class. :)
NESU and ATON content media
0
0
10
Dawn Luedecke
Aug 06, 2018
In Lsn: 16-Sector
Sectors are the medical, communication, and command centers for all of the units in an area. Each smaller unit reports directly to Sector. This unit is on a multifaceted base comprising of officerand enlisted alike to perform everything from comms watch to maintenance, intelligence, and medical care for the Coasties. Although Wikipedia isn’t the best place to look up information, the below information from there expertly and accurately explains the layout and missions of a Sector. Command Staff  The Commanding Officer of this base, a position called the Sector Commander, is typically in the rank of Captain (O6). From there, the Sector Commander's second-in-command is the Deputy Sector Commander and can be a Commander or Captain job.  Also reporting directly to the Sector Commander are the:     •    Command Master Chief (CMC)-The Chief whom all of the local Chiefs report to     •    Senior Reserve Officer - In charge of all of the local reservists     •    Auxiliary Coordinator - In charge of all of the local auxilarists, or volunteer Coast   Guardsman. Note:Auxilarists while they can be younger, are typically men and women of retirement age. Command Center The Sector Command Center (SCC) is the center of Sector Operations. It provides 24-hour command, control, coordination, communications, intelligence, sensor analysis, and data mining (C4ISM). The SCC coordinates with other federal, state, and local operations centers, and issues Notices to Mariners, Situation Reports, and maritime security alerts. The SCC displays the current Common Operating Picture (COP) and Common Intelligence Picture (CIP), including a presentation of all vessels, aircraft, communications equipment, and personnel belonging to the Coast Guard and supporting agencies. Contingency Planning and Force Preparedness The Contingency Planning and Force Readiness Staff develops and maintains plans covering readiness, logistics, and emergency preparedness. It coordinates with the three departments in plan development and execution,and plans and executes readiness exercises to test contingency plans. The Contingency branch also monitors the training and readiness of Sector Reserve Forces and manages their mobilization and demobilization. The Contingency Planning and Force Readiness staff also manages the federally mandated Area and Area Maritime Security Committees around the nation. Intel The Intelligence Staff is envisioned to collect, evaluate, report, and disseminate operational intelligence within the Sector. This staff will serve as the primary intelligence support element for all operations within the Sector. This staff forwards its analysis of raw intelligence reports to the District and the Atlantic or Pacific Maritime Intelligence Fusion Center, and will be the critical link between the Sector Commander and the entire Coast Guard intelligence enterprise, which is in turn a part of the United States Intelligence Community. Response The Response Department contains two Divisions:     •    Incident Management Division: Addresses SAR, pollution, and all hazards.     •    Enforcement Division:Provides administration and oversight to the Coast Guard Boat Stations and Cutters that enforce U.S. law and PWCS enforcement activities, such as armed boardings, vessel escorts andsecurity zone enforcement. This division works closely with federal, state, and local law enforcement and sister agencies within the DHS to respond to and mitigate the impact of maritime threats. Prevention The Prevention Department consists of three divisions.     •    Inspections Division: Manages and oversees the regulatory and inspection aspects of the Coast Guard’s safety, security, and environmental protection responsibilities for vessels and facilities.     •    Waterways Management Division: Controls aids to navigation; safety and security zones; Regulated Navigation Areas; ice breaking; and VTS and AIS.     •    Investigations Division: Initiates inquiries into marine casualties, pollution, boating violations, and assessment of civil penalties. Logistics The Logistics Department performs unit level maintenance and organic engineering, personnel, medical support, and finance/supply functions for the entire Sector.     •    Engineering/Support Division: Administers electronics and computer system, naval, aviation, vehicle, and facilities engineering; armory and small arms qualification; and environmental compliance. The associated Integrated Support Command or Aircraft Repair and Supply Center handle intermediate and depot level maintenance.     •    Administrative/Personnel Division: Handles medical, training, housing, and educational services.     •    Finance/Supply Division: Encompasses galley, transportation, and property and inventory management. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Coast_Guard_Sector Further breakdown in the Chain of Command from a Sector via the Response, Prevention, and Logistics sections are the individual units such as: Stations, Air stations, Cutters, MSST, NESU, and ANT Teams. These smaller units are the workforce units and report to the Sector. Sector is the communications center for mariners and stations. They have a 24/7 radio watchstander listening to the radio, and controlling Search and Rescue and Law Enforcement efforts in that Sectors Area of Responsibility (AOR). Essentially, your hero/heroine would more than likely be in one of the smaller units listed below, but reporting to and taking orders from Sector. Sector would make all of the major (non-emergency) decisions, and they would also most likely be the one to make reports to the media. 
Sector content media
0
0
7
Dawn Luedecke
Aug 03, 2018
In Lsn 15-Boats, aircraft
Today I’m going to give you a list of the ships and boats used by the Coast Guard with a brief explanation of each,and links resource material which will help you explore in depth. Next week we will explore landunits, their makeup and their individual missions.  The Coast Guard does many jobs, and each ship is designed to target a certain mission within the structure. I’ll give brief explanations below, but here is an extremely useful link to further explain each boat used:  https://www.uscg.mil/Portals/0/documents/CG_Cutters-Boats-Aircraft_2015-2016_edition.pdf?ver=2018-06-14-092150-230 Cutters Ice Breakers (420, 399, and 240 feet long)  The Coast Guard maintains four icebreakers: The Coast Guard Cutter (CGC) Healy (420 Feet long), CGC Mackinaw (240 feet long), the Polar Sea and the Polar Star (399 feet long). The CGC Mackinaw is the only ship that is not stationed out of Seattle, Wa., but instead breaks the ice in the Great Lakes region.  As their name states, the main mission of these boats is to break up the ice for civilian mariners to be able to transit safely through the frozen waters. In addition, the Polar Sea (currently being used for parts for the Polar Star) and Polar Star took/take trips to the North and South Poles in order to break up the ice there, and help support and resupply the scientists in those regions. National Security Cutter (418 feet long) These are some of our newest cutters, and as a Gunners MateI say the most awesome because of their new weapons system onboard. Where 378 and 270-foot cutters have the 76mm weapons system, these housethe 57 mm BOFORS. Unlike the 76mm which shout 76 rounds per minute and has several different types of rounds you had to choose from, the 57mm loads faster, can shoot up to 110 rounds a minute and has a bullet that can be programmed to go off in a variety of ways. In 2002, my supervisor had the privilege of trying out these weapons with the Navy to see if the Coast Guard was going to get them, so I was able to see what these new weapons can do before the rest of the Coast Guard. These National Security Cutters are the largest and most technologically advanced ships the Coast Guard currently has. They are better equipped for rough seas and have greater endurance, and better equipped for wartime. (Yes, even the Coast Guard has fought in wars). High Endurance Cutters (378 295 tall ship, 282) In the Coast Guardthere are 12-378 foot cutters, 1-295tall ship, 1-282 foot cutter, and 13-270foot cutters. These ships all have their individual names, but starting at the 378-foot length (but excluding the 295 tall ship) Coasties often refer to the size of the cutter rather than the individual boat when talking about them. For instance:  “What boat are you going to?” “I’m going to a 378 out of Seattle.” “What boat are you going to?” “The Coast Guard Cutter Mellon." The exception to these arethe Coast Guard Cutter Eagle, which is the Coast Guards only tall-ship and the CGC Alex Healy, which aids the Coast Guard in law enforcement and search and rescue in the treacherous waters of Alaska. The Coast Guard Cutter Eagle’s main mission is diplomatic. It houses an enlisted crew and the Coast Guard Academy cadets. Its main mission is to be a floating classroom for cadets. The enlisted crew is there as the experienced crew. It’s quite a sight to see in person.  Medium Endurance Cutter (270 foot long, 210-foot class) A 270 performs the same missions as the 378,but has a less sustainable underway time. While 378 can travel as far as Hawaii, and even occasionally Australia, a 270 goes as far as Central and South America. A 270 stays out on patrol for up to 90 days at a time before coming back to homeport (although they do pull in for 2-3 day port calls and to resupply in various places during that time). It also has a smaller crew than the High Endurance Cutters. These are the ships that hold the 76mm weapons systems in addition to the small arms .50cal and below. HINT: Crew size can be found on each explanation of the various ship in the pdf link above. The 14 210’s in the Coast Guard are the oldest ships we have and are slowly on their way out. These ships perform law enforcement and search and rescue along with the 270, but can only be out to sea for two months at a time before coming back to homeport. These ships have a 25mm weapons system, as well as small arms .50cal and below. Buoy Tenders (225 foot long, 175 foot long, 160-foot long, 100 foot long, 75 foot long) There are 16-225, and 14-175, 4-160,  1-100 ft, 8-75 foot seagoing buoy tenders in the Coast Guard. These are construction ships designed to maintain and replace aids to navigation out at sea. In addition to the above buoy tenders, the Coast Guard has 9-140 foot ice breaking tugs, and 18 65 and 75-foot river tenders. River tenders are stationed in the Mississippi River to maintain the river’s aids to navigation. Patrol Boats Now we go into the smaller cutters in the Coast Guard. These cutters perform search and rescue, towing, and law enforcement closer to shore. They can only go out to sea for weeks or days at a time and report to Sectors. New in the Coast Guard for patrol boats are the Fast Response Cutter (or FRC). Currently, there are 14+, with more being built within the next few years. These are 154-foot cutters designed for migrant and drug interdiction missions. 110-footcutters are the workhorses of the Cutter world. Able to sustain heavy seas, they are often sent out when stations and other units cannot get underway. There are 17 110’s all around the United States, and perform search and rescue and law enforcement. They house a 25mm weapons system as well as small arms .50cal and smaller. In addition, they also stand guard for Navy ships and submarines as they come and go from port. 87-foot patrol boats can only go out to sea for a few days at a time, and perform the same jobs as the 110, but do not have the sustainability or weapons system as the larger patrol boat. They maintain weapons .50 cal and smaller. Last is the 65-foot small harbor tug. There are 11 of them and have a crew of six and their primary mission is:domestic ice breaking, port security, law enforcement, and search and rescue. Small Boats Next, we go into small boats. These are the boats that stations use. There are a few more in the manual above, but I’m going to list the ones that you are most likely to see at a station or on a Cutter as some of them are for special units and rarely used. Cutters 110 and larger also have small boats that they lower into the water to make them more versatile for law enforcement and search and rescue. For these, I’m going to list them with pictures so that you can understand what they look like. For the cutters, please feel free to check out the PDF above. 47 Motor Life Boat (MLB) The 47mlb is the one seen in the video rolling over and is widely used. Here is the handbook for the 47. http://www.spinnakerpress.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/47-FT-MLB-Operator’s-Handbook.pdf 25-foot Response Boat-Small (RBS) 17-foot Utility Boat-Light (UTL) For cutters:  14-38 foot Cutter-based Boats-provide fast and effective surface capabilities to better interdict boats on the high-seas. Aircraft The Coast Guard maintains 202 fixed-wing and rotary-winged airplanes and helicopters. These aircraftshelp in law enforcement, search and rescue, and even supply drop off to cutters out at sea. More information on these can be found in the manual above. Planes HC-144A Ocean Sentry HC_27J Spartan Medium Range Maritime Patrol C-37A Gulfstream V Command and Control HC-130H Hercules and HC130j Super Hercules, Long Range Surveillance Helicopters MH-60T Jayhawk MH-65C/D Dolphin Short Range Recovery Helicopter
Ships, Boats, and Aircraft content media
0
0
13
Dawn Luedecke
Aug 01, 2018
In Lsn:14-SAR Gear
The Coast Guard uses many tools to help them with search and rescue efforts. From radio’s in the watch rooms, to monitors that pick up emergency beacon locations, flares, and more. Here are a few of the basic and most widely used emergency equipment used by the Coast Guard use for survival and rescue. Radio The radio is used by mariners and the Coast Guard alike to communicate, both to one another with basic chatter, and for emergencies. As mentioned previously, channel 16 is the international hailing and distress frequency. This is the channel all mariners go to when they need to get the attention of another mariner or land. They will then switch to a working channel. To talk to the Coast Guard in a non-emergency, they switch to channel 23. Life Vests Life vests are known in the Coast Guard as PFD’s, or Personal Floatation Devices. There are many types that we used depending on the job and restrictions. Thinner PFD’s which blow up when water activates it is used for Law enforcement and jobs that require more movement. Basic PFDs are used for everyday use, and the square ones pictured below are for survivors. Mustangs Mustangs are a PFD which covers the entire body, aids in floatation, and enables the wearer to stay warm in the water. Dry Suits Dry Suits are worn by Coast Guardsmen when doing missions in freezing water. These are watertight suits worn with PFD’s,and will extend the life of a survivor in hypothermic conditions. Emergency Beacons Emergency Beacons are used by both Coast Guard and civilians alike. While there are three main types of beacons (listed below), the Coast Guard works mostly with EPIRBs. An EPIRB will activate when submerged in water or turned upside down. So if a boat sinks, but the survivors did not have time to activate the EPIRB, it will go off and will notify the Coast Guard of the registered owner's location.  Beacon Types These are three types of beacons used to transmit distress signals:    EPIRB: Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon for maritime use     ▪    EPIRB Fact Sheet     ▪    Fishing vessel carriage requirements 46 CFR 25.26     ▪    121.5 MHz EPIRBs Prohibited 47 CFR 80.1051 ELT: Emergency Locator Transmitter for aviation use     ▪    Aircraft carriage requirements 14 CFR 91.207     ▪    Time to get a 406 MHz ELT PLB: Personal Locator Beacon for land-based applications https://www.dco.uscg.mil/Our-Organization/Assistant-Commandant-for-Response-Policy-CG-5R/Office-of-Incident-Management-Preparedness-CG-5RI/US-Coast-Guard-Office-of-Search-and-Rescue-CG-SAR/CG-SAR-2/Emergency-Beacons/ Boat Hooks  Boat Hooks are a tool used to hook the clothes of a survivor and bring them close enough to the side of the boat for a Coast Guardsman to grab and then haul onboard the Coast Guard boat or cutter. Line A line is used by mariners and the Coast Guard to secure anchors, the boats to piers, life rings, secure a person to the boat, towing, etc. Small lines with a monkey fist (white or orange weighted ball at the end of ofthe line) at the end and is used to toss to other boats or piers, and then tie off larger lines in order to bring the bigger line to the other side (as pictured below).  The size of the job or boat/cutter requires different sized line, so Coast Guard Boatswains Mates are often trained in how to properly braid the line so that they can make quick fixes if it snaps in half. Life Rings Life rings are used by mariners and Coast Guard for staying afloat and rescuing survivors. These are a donut-shaped floatation device which someone can use to stay afloat and usually attached with a line to a boat or pier. Flares Flares are an extremely important survival tool used by civilians and Coast Guard alike. For the Coast Guard, the main survival flare is called a pencil flare. These are attached to every life vest and use a small cartridge inserted into a tube with a pin in the bottom, and an odd-looking trigger. The cartridge is inserted into the tube, the round trigger uncocked and pulled to the bottom of the tube, and released as quickly as possible. The pin pierces the cartridge and sends the flare out the top and into the air. Coast Guardsman are trained in proper use of pencil flares while floating in the water so that if they fall overboard, they can use these flares when a boat is on the horizon.  How do you use it? 1. Lock trigger 2. Insert cartridge 3. Aim away from you, high in the air 4. Pull trigger all the way down 5. Release (let it snappforward hard) Whistles Whistles are attached to the life vests and used to get the attention of boats nearby Signal Mirrors Attached to the life vests and used to get the attention of aircraft and passing boats by reflecting the sun. Lighthouses While some lighthouses are privately owned or museums, the Coast Guard maintains most active Lighthouses in the United States. 
Safety Gear and Equipment content media
0
0
11
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 30, 2018
In Lsn: 13-Search and Rescue
The Coast Guard has four major units that participate in search and rescue operations: Sector, Cutters, Small Boat Stations, and Airstations. These units work alone and sometimes together to search and rescue sailors in distress. Here is a quick overview of their role in Search and Rescue, but we will go in-depth in their fiction later on in this class. Sector: Sector stands as the command center for all rescues. There they have a 24-hour radio watchstander that responds to mayday calls, logs everything, charts courses of ships, makes the decisions on who and what to do during operations, and reports everything to higher level commands. When in the middle of search and rescue, every unit will report to them via radio or phone. Cutter: Cutters can do further out to sea than Stations can, so they are a good resource for incidences that happen in Federal and International waters. How do they go about performing their rescue? That depends on the circumstance of the rescue. For instance, the weather plays a large factor in rescues. During Hurricanes, the Coast Guard cutters get underway so that they can be at the ready to perform heavy seas rescued for sailors who were unfortunate enough to get caught in the Hurricane. They also stand as helicopter refueling platforms because some heroes will also go out to sea if their immediate attention isn’t needed on land. During a normal rescue when the weather is not necessarily an issue, a Cutter will get intelligence or a radio call for help. In that instance, they will either sail to a specific location for survivors (if one is given), or they will begin a search pattern. During this time they have watchstanders on the bridge with either binoculars or night vision goggles. Personal onboard will also be on standby and watching the waters if they are outside. Once a rescue is imminent, a Cutter will do one of two things depending on seas and weather. They will either launch one of the cutters small boats to go and pick up the survivors, or they will bring the Cutter alongside the survivor and drop a Jacob's Ladder. Typically, the small boat is the easiest as the Coasties are trained in how to pluck survivors out of the water with ease, but again the rescue depends on seas and circumstance. When the survivors are onboard, they will be given blankets, food, shelter, water, and medical attention. Stations: Stations are a key player in Search and Rescue operations. Each with its own unique set of circumstances. For instance, some stations have extreme surf to go through just to get into open water, some also patrol Intercoastal waterways, and some have to navigate through ice in the water. Stations maintain a radio watch room where personal stand watch and listen to the radio. If a call comes over, they will sound the SAR alarm, and the on duty boat crew will gear up and respond with their small boats. Once survivors are on the small boat, they will either work with a helo crew to hoist the survivor into the helicopter, or they will bring the survivor to the station where the watchstander has an ambulance waiting if needed. Airstations: No doubt most in this class have seen The Guardian, so you may have a little insight into helo operations. Sector determines if a case needs a helicopter. If so, they will launch and search the water overhead. If they are first on scene, they may deploy the rescue swimmer if needed. Or they may work with a small boat to hoist a survivor into the helicopter in order to take them directly to the hospital if needed. Radio calls and certain incidences: Note: Channel 16 is the International Hailing and Distress Frequency. For boaters, this channel is to be used for emergencies; or to get the attention of the Coast Guard or another boat, and then switch to another channel to talk. Here is a good link to check out for more information on this: https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=mtBoater Rescues: In most ports, the Coast Guard does not take towing ‘emergencies’ unless the boater's life is in danger or they have been disabled in the water for a long period of time without the ability to get towed to shore by Tow Boat USA, Sea Tow, or another local towing company. Some ports do not have a towboat business, at which the Coast Guard will respond. When a boater calls for a tow, they are often panicked or scared, however, we calm them down and direct them to a towing company, and they contact them. Or we may contact the business of their choice. But even in that circumstance, things don’t always go as planned. Example: This case I was involved in during the early months of my career: Vessel: Mayday, Mayday, Mayday Coast Guard, this is (vessel name). Coast Guard Sector (picked up the radio before I did): Vessel in distress this is The United States Coast Guard. What’s your location? Vessel: Coast Guard this is (vessel name), we’re broken down at location (insert long/lat). Out of habit, and because I wasn’t on the radio with the boat, I plotted their location on a chart as Sector gave them the number to the local towboat companies. Thirty minutes later I was relieved of watch and went to get chow. I’d just sat down to eat when the SAR (Search and Rescue) Alarm went off in the building. Since I wasn’t yet qualified on the boat, I ran to the watch room in time to hear the watchstander brief the OOD (Officer of the Day) on what happened. Watchstander: I just heard “Mayday, Mayday, Mayday, this Sea Tow. I’m going down, I’m going down,” and then the radio went silent. OOD: Did Sector get their location? Watchstander: No. OOD: Where are they? Watchstander: I don’t know. I called the Sea Tow office and they said the last time they checked in, they were five nautical miles from the disabled vessel. Me: I plotted the disabled vessel’s location. We can subtract five nautical miles and get an idea from there. If it’s still on the charts. After that, we all ran to the charts, plotted the location of the sunk vessel using my prior plot point, and since I had allowed us to get a location on the Sea Tow vessel, the OOD let me gear up for the boat rescue (I was what’s called a ‘break in’ since I hadn’t yet gotten qualified in rescues). Fast forward fifteen minutes and I’m on the boat full speed to the rescue site when our watch stander comes over the radio to tell us to stand down. As a protocol, the watchstander shared the location with Sector, and Sector shared it will the other units in the area. Another Station arrived on scene mere minutes before we did, and found the Sea Tow Captain clinging to a buoy from his boat. His boat had sunk so fast that he didn’t have time to give us his location. Sea Tow then sent another boat out to get the disabled vessel. While this rescue ended well, many do not. It’s important to remember that during even the easiest Search and Rescue cases, many complications can arise. Here are a few tips for when you’re writing your Search and Rescue scene. The Coxswain (driver of the boat) will never let a civilian drive, and would not let one on the boat during a rescue in order to perform the rescue with him (not even a book's Navy Seal hero). The Coast Guard NEVER shuts their boats down during rescue because doing so could capsize the Coast Guard boat. The Coxswain is trained in maneuvering the vessel during rescues, and always needs to have control of the boat. The only reason the engine would be off is if there was an engine casualty. Non-helicopter rescue swimmers are Coasties from the station qualified to jump into the water (while tied to the boat) to pull someone to safety. Only if the CG boat is unable to pluck them out of the water by pulling alongside the victim. Rescue swimmers on a boat are a last resort effort. There is always another station close enough to take over a rescue if needed. The Coast Guard would not need to call in a civilian (i.e. the hero of a book) Helicopters crews may get to the scene of an accident if the CG rescue boat is delayed for some reason. In that case, the helo will deploy a rescue swimmer (like the ones from The Guardian), and hoist the survivors into the helicopter via a basket or connected to the rescue swimmer via a harness. During heavy weather, the crew of the 47MLB may remain inside if the coxswain deems it necessary until the rescue. The coxswain will make this decision based on the skill level of the crew and the size of the surf. However, while the crew has better visibility from the open bridge, it's a dangerous place to be in a rollover situation. If a non-Coast Guardsman is on the boat, they will be secured in a seat belt inside a water tight survivors compartment on the 47MLB. On small boats, when the crew is outside during heavy weather, they are tied to the boat in case they fall overboard or roll. A 25 RB-S or smaller boat could be the boat of choice in nice weather. These are the orange boats you see going fast on movies. Some do not have an inside for survivors but do have seats with seatbelts, and some have small enclosed structures. 47 MLB (heavy weather small boats) are known for (and designed to) roll 360 degrees if overtaken by a wave. Here’s a quick video to let you see how a 47MLB rolls over. The coxswain is trained on how to approach the waves to reduce the risk of a rollover, but sometimes it can’t be avoided. We will go more in depth later in the class in regards to boats, cutters, and equipment used for rescues. Homework: Ask questions.
Search and Rescue content media
0
0
11
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 27, 2018
In Lsn 12: Gear and Laws
LE Uniform Law Enforcement Officers in the Coast Guard are called two things: a Boarding Officer, and a Boarding Team member. Think of it this way…if the Boarding Officer is the sheriff, then the Boarding Team members would be the deputies. When they go out, they start with basic uniforms and bullet proof vests beneath or on top of their uniforms (depending on the unit they are at and what LE gear is provided by the unit). While out on the small boat, the boarding team will also have a safety helmet and/or ball cap, and a life vest; or if the weather and seas are cold: a dry suit or mustang (a cold weather jumpsuit that also acts as a life vest). Then they have a law enforcement belt complete with: SIG .40, extra magazine, handcuffs, pepper spray, and a baton. Some Boarding team members will also carry a M870 riot shot gun or M16 with extra magazines. Boarding Team Wearing Dry Suit and life vest SIDE NOTE: This is the Gunners Mate in me, but a magazine is NOT a “clip” as gangsters like to call it. A magazine is the metal container which holds the bullets and pushes them into the weapon, while a clip is a strip of metal which holds together M16 (or other semi automatic/automatic weapon) rounds but does not go into the gun. CG Law enforcement officers are trained in weapons, use of force, take down techniques, how to sweep a vessel/room, and much more. In order to become a Boarding Officer, a Coast Guard member has to attend The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) in Charleston South Carolina. This training center isn’t just for Coast Guard, but any federal law enforcement agency including FBI, Boarder Patrol, and even local and tribal law enforcement officers nation wide. Here, Boarding Team members learn many valuable LE techniques. https://www.fletc.gov/learn-about-fletc Enforcing Laws Because there are different challenges on the water compared to on land, many of the standard rules and restrictions for police officers, FBI, DEA, etc do not pertain to Coast Guard. Which is why other law enforcement agencies will call the Coast Guard to assist in any water related incidence. For example: The US code 14 USC 89A is the law that gives the Coast Guard the ability to board a vessel within its jurisdiction without a warrant. (So if your FBI/DEA/Police Officer is needing to search for drugs or other contraband on a ship...even a ship moored to a U.S. pier, they can call in the CG and essentially work under them to do so without having to obtain a warrant first). They can board a vessel at any time for any reason, and can sweep a vessel as long as there is reasonable suspicion. However, there are challenges in enforcing the laws depending on where they are in the water. For instance: are they moored, in state waters, federal waters, or international waters? Each boundary has certain rules and restrictions for things such as enforcing fishing rules, local laws, and also jurisdiction. Each case would be different with different restrictions and complications. Jurisdiction: From shore to 3 nautical miles out is State water. From 3 nautical miles out to 24 nautical miles is Federal water, and outside of the 24 nautical mile range is International waters. Here is an example of the boundaries as used to determine fishing rules in Florida waters. http://myfwc.com/media/2803315/shallow-water-grouper-map-sm.pdf NOTE: "Maps" of the waters are called charts, not maps. A nautical mile is 6,076 feet or 1.15 miles. To keep these laws straight since there are so many various laws in each zone that the Coast Guard has to remember, they have a few resources to use in addition to their extensive schools. Including a BOJAK (Boarding Officer Job Aid Kit), which is like a law bible for them (link to a study guide for the BOJAK posted below). And when out on the water, Coastie's use a personal device which is connected via satelite. This device will detect where they are, and bring up a list of laws as well as help them determine which federal or local agency has senior jurisdiction in that area. However, it should be noted that out on the water agencies tend to work together to determine jurisdiction since it is a murky area (pun intended ;) ). Here is the study guide/cheat sheet for the BOJAK that one smart Coastie put together and published online. You can use this as a reference and/or look up the individual US Codes cited. http://boatswainsmate.net/BM/BOStudyGuide.pdf HOMEWORK: Any final questions or concerns for the Law Enforcement side of the class? Next we will learn about the Coast Guards roll in search and rescue.
Law Enforcement Gear and Laws and Challenges content media
0
0
15
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 25, 2018
In Lsn 11: Law Enforcement
Fisheries Another major Law Enforcement job for Coast Guardsmen is Fisheries. Here they work with local government to enforce environmental laws in order to balance the species in the seas. Each area (i.e. State) has different challenges and needs in regards to Environmental laws. In order for a Coast Guardsman to work on enforcing these, they are required to go to schools specific for their area. Once they complete their schooling, they work with State Wild Life Officers to enforce fisheries laws in the waters. They look for compliance to fish size standards, size of the nets they are using, types of fishing gear, poaching protected species, and other laws enacted by the Federal and State Governments. During these patrols many non-fish related obstacles may arise. For instance, during one of my husbands fisheries boardings, they ran the ID’s into the national database and discovered one of the men onboard was a wanted felon with multiple warrants. They then had to detain the felon and bring him to the local sheriff department. While their main mission is fisheries, they may find themselves issuing BUI (boating under the influence), checking safety gear on board to make sure it meet standards, and arresting various individuals for various reasons. Alien Migration Interdiction Operations (AMIO) One of the biggest missions the Coast Guard performs is Alien Migration Interdiction Operations, or AMIO. I realize lately that illegal migrant ops have been a touchy subject in the United States, so I’ll warn you that this topic may trigger some. AMIO is not only performed in order to balance the influx of migrants coming into America, but primarily to rescue them at sea because they are often in shotty, homemade, unseaworthy craft, and are frequently found in dire straits and on the verge of death. Watchstanders on the cutters are trained on how to spot both go-fasts on the horizon, and boats that don’t seem right. For instance, Cuban migrants were known for secretly turning old vehicles into boats. Such as this truck-boat that was a famous image among Coasties when I was in the Coast Guard. However dangerous this invention was, the way they stacked people onto the boats is even more dangerous. In order to get the most people as possible on the boats, human smugglers would often stack people laying on top of one another like candy bars in a box. On one case my husband had, they found a 40 foot sailboat with 192 illegal migrants stacked on top of one another. The migrants couldn’t move from their position or they risked capsizing the 40 foot sail boat. When a Coastie wakes up for watch only to see a tattered sailboat (or something like the truck-boat) on the horizon, they know right away it could turn into a search and rescue mission in an instant. During that mission, the Coast Guard small boat approached and began to take the migrants to the Cutter. While transiting, the migrants on the sailboat began to move, and the boat capsized. The Coasties then launched into search and rescue mode, but there were, unfortunately, some migrants that didn’t make it. The image of the people reaching out for rescue while sinking into the depths, (yet too far away to be rescued) haunted some of the members of the boat crew. I still remember my husband talking about it. The below is not a picture of that event, but one for reference for you. Migrant ops start with the discovery of an odd looking boat on the horizon, but once the Law Enforcement and rescue teams bring the illegal migrants to the Cutter, the Coast Guard crew processes them. The Coast Guard takes anything off them that could be considered contraband or used as a weapon. For instance, when I was performing this mission, the main thing I took off of them were shoe laces and urine-soaked crackers (which was all they had had to eat in two weeks). See, the migrants use the bathroom on top of one another where they lay, and they don't eat or drink anything unless they happen to have something on them. The CG then gives them clean clothes, flip flops, and hygiene items, and they are brought onto the flight deck where they are brought to a shelter that the Coasties erected, and then given bedding, and food and water. During this time they are also interviewed to determine if any have a criminal record, if any are seeking asylum, which ones are family members (Family members are kept together), and any other relevant information the Coast Guardsmen need to know. During their stay on the cutters, the migrants are given food, shelter, bedding, hygiene items, restrooms, religious items (if they have and extended stay) and allowed to take daily showers. Which they didn’t have and weren’t allowed on their smuggler boats. Many of the Coast Guardsmen with children will also sneak the kids cookies or candy bars from the galley. After the migrants are settled, the ship is told by Area command what to do with them. This is the political part of the process because Area will be in contact with the government where the migrants started out. From there, they are either switched to another Cutter headed toward their home country, or the Cutter they are on will bring them safely home. The Cutter does not moor up to the pier, but the Cutter's small boats will bring them over to their home shore and turn them over to their government. The Coast Guard prides itself in the way it treats any civilian that comes across the decks of their ships, whether American citizens or migrants. Even when it is potentially dangerous to the Coasties themselves. In 2016, Obama repealed the wet foot dry foot policy that was enacted in 1966, and revised in 1997. In this policy, Cubans in search of asylum in America could stay if they successfully set foot onto American soil. With the ending of this policy came an influx in illegal Cuban migrants trying to come to America before the law was finalized. However, it needs to be noted that the majority of these illegal migrants were men of prime age (as you can see in the photo above), and many of them are known criminals in both America and Cuba. During the law change for the Cubans, the Coasties brought a religious pastor on board so that the migrants could worship if they wanted. They were also given bibles and paper and pencils to use. Unhappy with the food that was life sustaining and not "Cuban food," they claimed they were mistreated. The migrant men rioted and made shanks out of toothbrushes in order to try to murder the Coasties (my husband included). The Coast Guardsman stood watch over the migrants, armed with only a baton and pepper spray, and only the biggest and highest trained law enforcement agents on the boat were allowed above decks during this time. There were many other things that happened, but I won’t go into detail. Many Coasties voiced their concerns about making it home alive, and some even now have PTSD from the experience. The migrant men then took the paper provided them and made a note in a bottle (or rather rubber glove they had somehow got ahold of) and claimed abuse by the Coast Guard. The note made it to America and the news reported it as abuse by the military without checking the facts. The Coast Guard was later cleared because they hadn’t abused the migrants, and the camera’s on the boat proved as much. I’m not saying that there aren’t/weren't a few women and children in the mix, but the majority of illegal migrants that come across the Coast Guard’s decks, especially during that law transition, are/were violent men and repeat offenders. This is common as most illegal migrants that come across on the boats tend to be younger men, but most civilians don’t realize that fact. My plea to you is in the future if you see a news report regarding the Coast Guard and illegal migrants is please give Coasties the benefit of the doubt. These are just a few of the main missions the Coast Guard does in regards to law enforcement. However, each day and each boarding/rescue is different and potentially dangerous for these men and women. In our next class you will learn about how the Coast Guard is different from other government agencies with their laws and techniques, and what they use for protection while out on a boarding. Homework: As always, ask questions.
Fisheries Enforcement and AMIO content media
0
0
14
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 23, 2018
In Lsn 10: Drug Interdiction
For Coast Guardsmen stationed on large cutters (typically 210ft long and bigger) a patrol down in the caribbean means many things. Fun port calls, long work weeks, and if you’re lucky a drug bust. These patrols are designed to interdict drug smugglers, and is known as a JIATF South (Joint Inter Agency Task Force South) patrol. These are typically a multi-mission patrol concentrating on interdicting drug smuggling operations, but could mean any number of missions. For today, we will concentrate on drug interdiction. Here is a quick news debrief video of the bust my husbands ship did in 2016. During these patrols, we work together with different agencies and different countries to intercept these criminals. For this class, and so that I don’t cross the line of sharing too much information, i’m first going to tell you an in depth story about how my ship in 2002 got our bust, and then show you a video which shows you exactly how these operations work. With my story for context, you will be able to see on the video exactly what happens, and why. ~Somewhere in the Pacific ocean between Costa Rica and Mexico~ During a particularly long week where we were doing a lot of training exercises and not much else, my shipmates and I met on the flight deck (next to the helicopter) where we had expected to perform a General Quarters Drill. (General Quarters is a war time/battle drill. My job during GQ was to man the port side .50 caliber with my gun crew. However, this patrol was a HITRON patrol with the helicopter. In which case, my job was to provide the weapons for the helicopter crew and then standby ready to go to the .50 calibers. As the Executive Officer stepped through the hatch onto the flight deck for the drill, the Commanding Officer was called to the bridge via a nearby flight deck telephone. We, the crew, sat by to patiently wait for him to return and start the drill. Intead, we heard: “Now, this is not a drill. Set General Quarters. Now, this is not a drill. Set General Quarters. Go-fast spotted off the port side.” My heart began to thump as I raced to the weapons locker holding the HITRON weapons, and began to ready their magazines and .40 caliber rifle. Within minutes, the weapons were loaded with the flight crew, and the helicopter launched. Shortly after that, our small boats were lowered and underway, and following the helo's path. Instead of heading to the .50 calibers, my gun crew was ordered to stay inside, and I was directed to the bridge. While there, I heard the story. A nearby Navy plane had been completing a routine patrol when they spotted a go-fast trying to cover up with a blue tarp. (Drug smugglers run their boats [called go-fasts] at night, and during the day they cover up with a blue tarp to sleep and stay out of sight). More recently, drug runners have taken to using semi-submersible vessels. As a result we have reverted to different takeover tactics. As seen in the more recent Alto Su Barco video. Note: the Coasties on this bust are enlisted personnel. (NOT CGI) Enlisted personnel are the main Law Enforcement Agents. But I digress...now back to my story The Navy called in the smugglers to us, and we launched General Quarters. On the bridge, I was told to go to the 03 deck (the very top of the ship right below the mast) and stand by with smoke floats. Smoke floats are large tubs that when the chemical inside mixes with sea water it emits a colored smoke. See, when the drug smugglers in go-fasts know they are caught they will toss the drugs overboard, along with pots/pans, bedding, and bacially everything not bolted down. Their goal is to lighten the load to gain speed and escape. (If you look close, you will see this happening in the new video below) While our helicopter and one small boat were chasing the smugglers, our job on the ship was to locate the floating drugs, and mark them for a second small boat to pick up. My job was to toss the smoke floats near the bails of cocain. Later that night we got all decked out in protective gear so that we didn’t accidentally absorb the drugs as we handled them (as seen later in the video), we then tested and organized the two tons of cocain, as the small boat crew arrested and transferred the smugglers to the nearby Navy ship. When the helicopter returned, the crew got to hear the story from the gunner. After chasing down the smugglers as they offloaded the drugs, (and while the bridge on the CGC Seneca warned them to stop over the radio), our small boat crew and helicopter made every attempt to convince the smugglers to stop (which can also be seen in the video). When they wouldn’t comply, the small boat pulled back, and the helicopter gunner fired warning shots across the bow (standard operating procedures. Even I was trained on warning shots, and you will see them do it on the video below). When the smugglers continued to drive on even after the warning shots, the helo gunner then fired disabling shots into the go-fast’s engines…actually this particular gunner was so good that he fired one shot through both engines. Now DIW (dead in water) the smugglers had no choice but to surrender. They were then detained and transferred to the Navy for prosecution in America as the Navy was headed home to California. With the smugglers being handled by the small boat crew, CGC Seneca and the second small boat crew then continued to return to the smoke floats to pick up and secure all of the drugs, and put them into our magazine (a large room where we kept all of our ammunition). My .50 cal gun crew then got to target practice on the now empty go-fast. We practiced warning shots across the bow, and disabling shots at the stern until it caught fire and sank. The Coast Guard does this so that the go-fast boat can never be used to smuggle again. From then on, the only people allowed in the magazine with the drugs were the Commanding Officer, Executive Officer, and me. Why me? Because I was the lowest ranking Gunners Mate, the drugs were locked in our space, and I got to be the muscle to arrange and rearrange the drugs when Government Officials came onboard to view the bust. Homework: Watch the video below and see if you can see the similarities between my ship’s bust, and the HITRON crews video. While every bust is different with different obstacles to overcome (as seen/heard in my husbands news video about their bust), this is our standard and most effective way to perform the drug busts on the high seas. Note: this is not the same drug bust. Ask any questions you may have.
Drug Interdiction content media
0
0
29
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 20, 2018
In Lesson 9-Morale & History
Morale Moral in the Coast Guard is different than most military organizations since we are so small. If you go to an air force, navy, army, or even joint base; you’ll find all kinds of things to entertain you. From fast food restaurants to bowling alleys, car garages, walking trials, and even cheap equipment rentals. Not in the Coast Guard. Because they are so small, the bases are also. Mostly, we rely on events, special opportunities, and sporting days for moral. One of the best places for moral that we have been stationed is Valdez Alaska. With all of those wintery days, it’s no wonder. What Valdez did for us was have equipment rentals like boats to go salmon and halibut fishing, RV rentals to go camping, RV parking on the base, and even a greenhouse where we could check out a plot to plant some fresh vegetables (believe me…fresh veggies were rare in Valdez). Another example of the various types of moral is on my ship, The CGC Seneca, we were out to sea in the Caribbean doing a law enforcement patrol (drug busts, alien migration interdiction, etc). We had been sailing for weeks with no land in sight. To boost moral, the Captain had authorized plight helmets as a uniform item (but only when we were underway, and only when no other ships were around). One day, he pulled out the moral shotgun. Whoever wished, could go outside and take turns skeet shooting off the flight deck. He even gave liberty to anyone who could shoot three in a row. (I got special liberty…btw ;) ) One popular moral event cutter Captains like to do is to slow the ship down to allow the crew to fish off the stern, or stop completely for ‘swim call.’ During swim call, they launch a small boat to act as a pick up, and the crew is allowed to jump off the ship into the ocean and swim. On board, a gunners mate stands shark watch with an M16. *It should be noted that the protocol for shooting at a shark is to shoot in front of it to scare it away as shooting it directly would cause it to bleed, and attract more sharks* At land units, they like to celebrate Coast Guard Day every August 4. On this day, each unit may do a variety of things. Some have celebrations at the base with kiddie games and a barbecue, some have trips to places like six flags, and some have beach days. Each land unit may have their own traditional moral day as well, and some even keep dogs as “unit members” to help boost the crews spirits during their duty days. History Being a historical author, I’m fascinated by the past. One thing in particular that I love is the Coast Guard’s history. Filled with heroines who single handedly rescued dozens of lives, men who lived by the motto ‘we have to go out, but we don’t have to come back,’ and tall ship sailors. The Coast Guard was formed when the government put together three organizations: The Lighthouse service, The Life Saving Service, and The Revenue Cutter service. Lets take a quick look at each one. Many of my books center around these organizations. My editors love the romance of my Lighthouse heroines and Life Saving heroes. In fact, I’m currently waiting for Kensington to respond to a proposal for a new series incorporating all three of these organizations into one plot line. The Lighthouse Service was one of the first to emerge. Lighthouse Service Needing to warn the sailors of dangers ahead, in 1789 the government began to manage 12 colonial lighthouses along the eastern shoreline. Although the only one of these original 12 that still exists is the Sandy Hook, NJ lighthouse built in 1764. https://www.nps.gov/maritime/nhlpa/handbook/HistoricLighthousePreservationHandbook_04_Part2.pdf These lighthouses often housed women who served as Lighthouse Keeper. Many Coast Guard ships are named after the famous women of the past. One woman in particular that the Coast Guard loves to honor is Ida Lewis. Here is a quick video on why this woman was the quintessential example of a heroine. Here is a good video about Ida Lewis: https://www.c-span.org/video/?438467-1/life-legacy-ida-lewis In my WIP, my setting for book 1 is the Pensacola Lighthouse. During my research, I found that the real heroine of the lighthouse at that time may or may not have murdered her husband in order to gain the title of Keeper. Since the murder couldn’t be proven, theres no way to tell. However, the Lighthouse is said to be haunted by her ghost. While this doesn’t help my romance, it is interesting to hear the stories behind the buildings I’m using. Life Saving Service The other day, my husbands friend posted the below meme, and I got excited. It’s perfect for this class. The picture below is of a Life Service member doing a beach patrol. I’m not sure if this particular hero was really looking for Nazi’s, but what I do know is this was a real picture. Life Savers used to patrol the beaches on horses looking for wrecked ships, enemies during wartime, and sailors in need. Their job was to run the shorelines, and report back to the station if anything was amiss so that the station could react. In my WIP with Kensington, the hero of book 2 is a Life Saver who patrols the beach on his horse. Unlike today where the Coast Guard uses motorized boats to respond to incidences, the Life Saving stations of the past had to use horse/people drawn carts to tow the boats, row boats to navigate the surf, cannons to shoot lines, and a mechanism called a breeches buoys to rescue sailors from close to shore shipwrecks. In Pensacola during the time of my book the Life Saving station was situated on the Island on the other side of the inlet from the Lighthouse. Here, the station had a building for survivors they called ‘The House of Refuge’. This would house any sick and/or stranded sailors until they were well enough to make the trip across the inlet to the nearby town or military fort. If any of you have been to Virginia Beach, you may have seen a little building amongst the tall hotels known as the Virginia Beach Surf and Rescue Museum. This is an amazing museum to visit for all things Life Saving stations. With real and recreations of the actual mechanism used for rescues, and in depth information on day to day activities of the Life Savers, it’s a no miss tourist spot for visitors. In addition, there are organizations along the eastern shoreline that occasionally role play Life Saving rescues. Keep an eye out for those events if you’re ever on the eastern coastline. https://vbsurfrescuemuseum.org Revenue Cutter Service Lastly, the Coast Guard added the Revenue Cutter Service. Merged with what is now the Coast Guard in 1915, this organization was originally established to collect tariffs from ships coming and going to port, but would eventually end up fighting pirates and smugglers, aiding the Navy during the Civil War, and even standing as floating lighthouses for mariners. Here is a good website to check out for more information on this organization: https://www.archives.gov/research/military/logbooks/revenue-cutter-and-coast-guard.html Who doesn’t love a good pirate hunter? In one of my historical Coast Guard WIPS, my hero’s ship has just come back from ridding the Caribbean of pirates, and is now taking on a smuggler near the Pensacola shoreline. In today’s Coast Guard, many the larger ships are names after the Revenue Cutters of the past. The history of the Coast Guard is so romantic to me. Mostly because they were all heroes or heroines who did extraordinary things in real life. And what I’ve provided here is just the beginning of this amazing organization’s history. From women rescuers, to Douglas Munro—a man who gave his life to rescue 500 marines from the shores of Guadalcanal in World War 2, to Nathan Bruckenthal who gave his life during the Iraq War when a suicide bomber attacked the ship he was on. It’s apparent that the men and women who choose to be a part of this organization define what it means to be a hero/heroine. Homework: Post any questions.
Morale and History content media
0
0
18
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 18, 2018
In Lesson 8-Traditions
Traditions Surfmen, Cuttermen, Albatross, Pterodactyls, Mariners, Queens, Goat Lockers, and more; the US Coast Guard has several unique and colorful awards, ceremonies, and references. As one of the smallest of the countries armed uniformed branches, the United States Coast Guard has a rich and varied tradition of service awards, ceremonies, and honors. Here are a few websites that explain some of the traditions we hold. Some of the traditions I will explain myself based on my experience. https://worldhistory.us/military-history/us-coast-guard-traditions-and-honors.php http://live.cgaux.org/?p=5191 Let’s start with some of the ones you can find online with brief explanations from me: Surfmen “The US Coast Guard was formed in 1916 when the Revenue Cutter Service and the Lifesaving Service were merged and the new amalgam organization renamed (this information is covered in more detail later this week). One of the old traditions of the 19th-century Lifesaving Service was certifying surfboat coxswains, who captained rescue boats through the pounding waves to rescue those lost at sea, as Surfmen. Today this is an extreme elite group of coxswains who stand ready at 19 designated “surf stations” around the United States. These 161 coastguardsmen are the Navy Seals of Search and Rescue (I’m not sure if I would say Navy Seals of Search and Rescue, because they aren’t really doing what the typical Navy Seal does. They’re more just driving the boats in surf, but they certainly are hero material because that in itself is extremely dangerous…and perhaps they’re a little addicted to the feel of adrenaline) and operate 47-foot Motor Rescue Boats (reminder, these are NOT cutters but they are small boats used at stations) and a quartet of Eisenhower-era 52-foot Motor Lifeboats in some of the worst seas imaginable.” The school for this is at Cape Disappointment, Washington, but once qualified, and surfman can be stationed anywhere there is heavy surf. Here’s a great video shot in 2011 where you can see just what these surfman coxswains (boat drivers) go through. Ancient Albatross and Pterodactyls “The current Ancient Albatross award was established to honor the most senior individual Coast Guard aviator in 1966. Enlisted aircrews were added to the award in 1988. The current officer is Vice Admiral John P. Currier while the current enlisted man is Aviation Maintenance Technician Senior Chief Peter G. MacDougall who has been flying since December 1975 when he started as a Flight Mechanic on the Sikorsky HH-3F “Pelican” helicopters. Honorees perform the award ceremony wearing vintage Red Baron”-style flying leathers, goggles, scarves and caps. These awards are part of the larger US Coast Guard Aviation Association formed in 1977 by retired USCG aviators. Today it has some 1200 members who proudly refer to themselves collectively as the Ancient Order of Pterodactyls because they have been flying since the earth was flat.” So essentially the oldest airdale becomes the Ancient Albatros. The Coast Guard Cutterman and Mariner honors “In 2007, the US Coast Guard, now under the Department of Homeland Security and celebrating its 217th birthday, decided to institute an honor for old salts and established the Master Cutterman certificate for those who had served 20 years at sea. The wording, punched up by Admiral Thad Allen, the unsung hero of the Deepwater Horizon disaster reads: “To all sailors who have crossed the deck of a Cutter, from the ghosts of the Revenue Marine to the United States Coast Guard, wherever ye may be; And to all Ancient Mariners, Albatrosses, Pterodactyls, Surfman and various breeds of Dogs; Let it be known that ______ has stood watch, laid before mast, made rounds, checked the navigational lights, monitored engine temperatures, launched boats as required, balanced the electrical loads, provided rations and otherwise attended to the watch, quarter and station bill for all evolutions required to guard the coast and protect the Nation for 20 years. Accordingly, all cutterman with lesser sea time and those unaccustomed to venturing offshore shall show due honor and respect at all times.” As of 2017, more than 600 certificate members have joined to form the Coast Guard Cuttermen Association. The Cutterman honor their senior most members with the title Ancient Mariner. The USCG officer still on duty with the longest linage of sea time is referred to as the Gold Ancient Mariner while the veteran enlisted man is the Silver Ancient Mariner. Admiral Robert J. Papp, Jr. who, serving since 1975 holds the Gold award, and Master Chief Boatswain’s Mate Steven Hearn whose service since 1981 earned him the Silver hold the current titles. As their badge of office, they carry nautical spyglasses and authentic relic headgear of the Revenue Cutter Service and Lighthouse Service respectively when carrying out Mariner duties.” While my husband is a cutterman (meaning he’s been on a boat out to sea for a minimum of 5 years) I’m very glad he is not a Master Cutterman. When a person becomes a cutterman, he/she gets to wear a pin on their uniform above their nametape with the cutter man symbol to signify their accomplishement. The Queen of the Fleet The oldest commissioned ship in the Coast Guard is known as the Queen of the Fleet. Her numbers were painted in gold on her hull, and her crews wear distinctive devices upon their uniforms. The current Queen is the USCGC Smilax, at age 67 she is one of the last World-War-Two era vessels afloat, much less still in active daily service. Goat Locker Earlier in the terminology lesson, you learned what a mess was. Remember? A mess is a term used to describe where people gather to eat. AKA a Chiefs Mess, Crews Mess, or Officer Mess. So what is a Goat Locker? A goat locker is a term used to describe the Chief’s Mess, or the room where only Chiefs eat, sleep, and are allowed to come and go without permission. So why do I have this tidbit of information in the traditions section? Because the reason this is called the Goat Locker is because in the old days, this room was where they also kept the ships goat, which provided fresh milk for cooking. This isn’t strictly a Coast Guard tradition, however. This is a Navy/Coast Guard tradition. Nowdays, instead of a goat, the crew is allowed to keep contraband they pick up at foreign ports in the Chiefs Mess/Goat Locker. For instance, alcohol is not permitted on the cutters, but if they pick up a cheap bottle in Jamaica, they can check it into the Goat Locker for the Chiefs to watch over until they reach homeport. Order of the Ditch There are two certificates every sailor looks forward to getting. The Order of the Ditch, and becoming a Shellback. The Order of the Ditch is not a ceremony as much as a certificate you get for having gone with the boat through the Panama Canal. Crossing the Equator/Shellback Becoming a Shellback is a fun and exciting experience for any Coast Guardsman. This is a ceremony that includes little sleep, obstacle courses and challenges of a disgusting nature, and kissing Neptune’s belly. The only time this ceremony happens is when a cutter crosses the equator. To become a shellback, a pollywog (new person) is put under the charge of a person on the ship who is a Shellback. Those pollywogs are essentially the Shellback’s slave until the time comes that they cross the equator and the pollywog completes the tasks needed to become a Shellback himself/herself. I was just starting to be the slave to a Shellback (essentially, I was going to be mess cooking…or in other words cleaning the galley and helping to cook even though I was a Gunners Mate). We had expected a few nights of little sleep, lots of fun, and some gross tasks. However, at the last minute we were diverted for a drug bust. Alas, while I did get the Order of the Ditch, I never became a Shellback. My husband has done both, though. Unit Level Traditions Like in the fleet, many units have their own traditions. Some have dogs for mascots, some do parades on certain local holidays, and some have days when their families can come aboard the ship and go on a day ‘cruise.’
Traditions content media
0
0
12
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 16, 2018
In Lesson 7: Terminology
Terminology One thing a Coastie spouse always hears when she’s out in the civilian world, and meets another spouse is: “Man I’m glad to talk to someone who knows what I’m saying.” I had this conversation just last week, in fact. Lol. It’s quite fun to talk to one another, surrounded by civilians, and have everyone else staring with blank faces. For this class we’re going to start with some basic language Coasties (and their spouses) are well versed in. Later on in when we learn about law enforcement and search and rescue, you may need to look back at some of these, or may learn new terms. ABOARD - on or in a ship. AFT - in, near or toward the stern (back) of the ship. AIRDALE - slang, a naval aviator. (anyone who works on the helicopters and airplanes) ALLOTMENT - part of a military persons pay which is assigned directly to a person or bank. ANCHOR - the hook used at the end of a chain and dropped to the sea bottom to hold a ship in one particular place. ANCHORAGE - suitable place for ship to anchor; a designated area of a port or harbor. ANCHOR’S AWEIGH - said of the anchor when just clear of the bottom. AOR - Area of Responsibility (used for defining each units search and rescue/law enforcement jurisdiction) AT - Annual Training for a Coast Guard Reservist. AYE-AYE - term used to acknowledge receipt of a command or order from senior. BELAY - to cancel an order; stop; firmly secure a line. BELOW - below decks; below main deck. BERTH - space assigned ship for anchoring or mooring. BILLET - an individual’s position in the ship’s organization. (For example, my husbands billet was the Electrician’s Mate Chief, or EMC, on his last cutter.) BOATSWAIN - refers to warrant officer or petty officer in charge of boats, rigging, and ground tackle aboard ship. (Not to be confused with Boatswains Mate, which is a rate in the CG. A boatswain on the boat is an extra duty job on the boat and designed for only one of the ships Boatswains Mates or Warrant officer to do) BOOT - slang for recruit. BOW - most forward part of a ship. The front. BRAVO ZULU or BZ! – Well done! BRIDGE - platform or area from which ship is steered, navigated and conned; BRIG - Military jail. BROW - large gangplank leading from a ship to a pier, wharf or float; usually equipped with handrails. BULKHEAD - one of the upright, crosswise partitions dividing a ship into compartments. (In other words, this is what a wall is called on a boat) CAPTAIN - Rank of a senior officer, or title given to commanding officers of a cutter. (So essentially “Captain”” can mean one of two things…the rank of high level officers in the Coast Guard. OR the top ranking officer attached to a unit [not petty officers or chiefs—they are enlisted. When an enlisted member is in charge of a unit they are known as Officers In Charge, or OINC]. When an officer of any rank is in charge of a unit they are known as the “Captain” of that unit, whether or not they hold the rank of Captain in the Coast Guard.) CO - Commanding Officer (doesn't necessarily mean he's a Captain) COLORS - National ensign; distinguishing flag flown to indicate a ship’s nationality. COMMISSARY - grocery store on base where service members and families can purchase food, beverages, etc., at prices usually lower than in civilian stores. COMMISSION - to activate a ship or station; written order giving an officer rank and authority. COMMISSIONING CEREMONIES - ceremonies during which a new ship is placed in service. It is customary to invite friends of officers and others interested to attend the ceremony, along with the sponsor who christened the ship. COMPARTMENT - space enclosed by bulkheads (walls), deck (floor) and overhead (ceiling), same as a room in a building. COURSE - direction steered by a ship or plane. COURT-MARTIAL - military court for trial of serious offenses, CPO - Chief Petty Officer. CROW - (slang) eagle on petty officer's rating badge. CRUISE - to sail with no definite destination; more commonly used to describe round trip. DECK - a floor or platform extending from end to end of a ship. DEERS - Defense Eligibility Enrollment Reporting System. The DEERS database lists everyone entitled to active duty and retired pay and his or her family members. DEPLOY - tactical term used for dispersal of troops; also disposition of ships in battle formations. (When my husband’s boat goes out to sea with him on it, my husband is ‘deployed’) DIVISION - in the organization of ship or plane groups, the unit between sections and squadrons; in shipboard organization, Sailors and officers grouped together for command purposes. (So as and Electricians Mate Chief, my husband is in the Engineering Division, whereas a Boatwains Mate would be in what’s called the Deck Division). EAPC - Employee Assistance Program Coordinator EMBARK - to go aboard ship preparatory to sailing. ENLISTED EVALUATION - marks; written report of an enlisted service member's performance of duty. (Basically report cards used to evaluate how a person does their job) ENSIGN - lowest ranking commissioned officer; or term used for flags used as an official identification. (Officer right out of the Academy or term used to talk about a flag…i.e. National Ensign) EXCHANGE - department store run by the military. EXECUTIVE OFFICER (XO) - regardless of rank, the officer second in command. (So the first in command is known as the Captain, or CO, and the second in command is known as the Executive Officer, or XO) FANTAIL - main deck section in after part of flush-deck ship. FATHOM - in measuring depth of water, six feet. FLAG AT HALF-MAST - begun in times of mourning in old sailing days, indicated that grief was so great it was impossible to keep things shipshape. Half-masting of colors is the survival of days when slack appearance characterized mourning on shipboard. FLAG OFFICER - Rear Admiral, Lower Half; Rear Admiral, Upper Half; Vice Admiral; and Admiral are flag officers. (Highest ranking officers in the Coast Guard) FLEET - from Anglo-Saxon fleet. Organization of ships and aircraft under one commander. FLIGHT DECK - deck of ship on which planes land, takeoff. FORECASTLE - pronounced “focsul.” In the days of Columbus, ships were fitted with castle-like structures fore and aft. The structures have disappeared, but the term forecastle remains; refers to upper deck in forward part of ship. Abbreviated fo'c'sle. FORWARD - toward bow; opposite of aft. FRAME - ribs of vessel. GANGPLANK - see Brow. GANGWAY - open in bulwarks or rail of ship to give entrance; or order to stand aside and get out of the way. GEEDUNK - slang; ice cream soda, malted milk, anything from soda fountain or Geedunk stand. GENERAL QUARTERS - battle stations for all hands. (CG sets GQ when we are in a battle situation, or do things like take on drug smugglers, etc.) HASH MARK - slang, service stripe worn on (the left sleeve of the Bravo) uniform of enlisted personnel. Each stripe denotes four years of service. HEAD - nautical term for rest room, washroom or toilet. HEEL - to list over. HOLIDAY ROUTINE - followed aboard ship on authorized holidays and Sundays. HONORS - ceremonies conducted in honor of a visiting dignitary. HSWL RP - Health, Safety, and Work-Life Regional Practice HSWL SC - Health, Safety, and Work-Life Service Center KNOCK OFF - stop work; cease what is being done. KNOT - measure speed for ships and aircraft, LADDER - the stairs in a boat. LEAVE - paid vacation earned at the rate of two-and-a-half days per month of active duty. LIBERTY - authorized absence of individual from place of duty, not chargeable as leave. No period of liberty shall exceed a total of 96 hours. LOOKOUT - seaman assigned to watch and report any objects of interest; lookouts are "the eyes of the ship." MAST - (while the mast is also the tall part of the structure of the boat, this is in regards to a punishment ceremony similar to a trial) a captain’s mast, or merely mast, derived from the fact that in early sailing days the usual setting for this type of naval justice was on the weather deck near ship's mainmast. Currently, means type of hearing with commanding officer presiding in which any punishment administered is non-judicial in nature and is an alternative to court martial. MESS - a meal; or a place or group of officers and crew who eat together as in ‘the Chief’s Mess.’ However, the Chief’s Mess is a room for only Chiefs to eat together. Both officers and lower ranking personnel have to ask permission to enter a Chief’s Mess since Chiefs are the highest ranking enlisted personnel at the unit. MILITARY TIME - The easiest way to remember military or Coast Guard time is for any time prior to 10:00 a.m. simply add a zero before the hour, example: nine o’clock in the morning would be spoken as “zero nine hundred” and written as 0900. For any time after 12:00 noon simply add twelve to the time. MUSTER - to assemble crew; roll call. OIC - Officer In Charge OINC - Enlisted Person In Charge of a Unit OLD MAN - seaman's term for captain of a ship. OMBUDSMAN - spouse of a member of the command who is appointed by the Commanding Officer to serve as official liaison between the command and family members. PASSAGEWAY - corridor or hallway on ship. PCS - Permanent Change of Station PLAN OF THE DAY - schedule of day's routine and events ordered by Executive Officer; published daily aboard ship or at shore activity. PORT - left side of ship looking forward. QUARTERDECK - part of main deck reserved for honors and ceremonies; the station of the OOD in port. QUARTERS - living spaces assigned to personnel aboard ship; government-owned housing assigned to personnel at shore stations; or assembly of personnel for drill, inspection or meeting. RANK - grade or official standing of commissioned and warrant officers. RATE - grade or official standing of enlisted personnel; identifies pay grade or level of advancement. RATING - job classification with the Coast Guard, such as Electricians Mate (EM). SCUTTLEBUTT - a drinking fountain in Coast Guard is called scuttlebutt. A scuttlebutt in old days was a cask that had openings in the side, fitted with a spigot; also rumor, from the fact that Sailors used to congregate at the scuttlebutt or cask of water to gossip or report on day's activities - sometimes true, sometimes not. So we also call gossip, scuttlebutt. SEA BAG - large green canvas bag for stowing gear and clothing. SEA DUTY - assignment to ship (cutter) whose primary mission is accomplished while underway. SELECTED RESERVE (SELRES) - Coast Guard Reservists who are required to participate in active duty training periods and annual training, and are paid for this duty. SERVICEMEMBERS' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE (SGLI) - life insurance coverage up to $400,000 that can be elected by the service member. SHAKEDOWN CRUISE - cruise of newly commissioned ship to test machinery and equipment and train crew as a working unit. SHORT TIMER - one whose enlistment or tour of duty is almost completed. SICK BAY - ship’s hospital or dispensary. SIDEBOYS - impeccably uniformed crewmembers who participate in honors ceremonies on the quarterdeck. SKIPPER - meaning captain. STARBOARD - right side of ship looking forward. STERN - aft part of ship. STOW - to put gear in its proper place. SWAB - rope or yarn mop used for cleaning. TDY - Temporary Duty somewhere else other than your permanent station. TOPSIDE - upper level, or above decks. TURN TO - an order to begin work. UNDERWAY - a military vessel that is not presently moored to a pier, or at anchor. WARDROOM - a compartment aboard ship near officers' stateroom used as officers' mess room. Only officers eat and sit in this room unless and enlisted person is invited in by an officer. WATCH - period of duty, usually of four hours' duration. The day at sea has long been divided into watches which are now called: midwatch (midnight to 4 a.m.); morning watch (4 to 8 a.m.); forenoon watch (8 a.m. to noon); afternoon watch (noon to 4 p.m.); first dog watch (4 to 6 p.m.); second dog watch (6 to 8 p.m.); and first watch (8 p.m. to midnight). XPO- Executive Petty Officer - second in command petty officer XO - Executive Officer - Second in command officer Homework: Let me know if you know any nautical terms not listed here. :)
0
0
11
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 13, 2018
In Lesson 6: Advancements
Extra Duty Jobs Throughout the last two days we touched on the main jobs skills taught to a Coast Guardsman, whether officer or enlisted. But since this organization is so small everyone does multiple jobs in the Coast Guard. For example, my husbands main job in the Coast Guard is as a Chief Electrician. However, he is or has been a: Boarding Officer (federal law enforcement officer), a Victim Advocate (advocates for victims of abuse), a Command Drug and Alcohol representative (investigates drug and alcohol related incidences), and a drill instructor. These are just a few extra jobs available to the Coast Guardsmen. The extra duty jobs available to Coasties are constantly evolving with each year, each rate, and each unit. So much so that even as an electrician, my husband could be working the lines during mooring, doing first aid on wounded shipmates, cooking supper for the crew on occasion, or cleaning weapons with the Gunners Mates. These are examples of different jobs on a unit level, where everyone helps everyone. Then there are extra jobs within the rate or at a Coast Guard wide level, and these change constantly. One example of and extra duty job in the Coast Guard as a whole that has evolved is the Coast Guard to Navy Seal program. When I was in the CG, the Navy launched a program to allow Coast Guardsman to apply for and become Navy Seals if they had what it took to make it through BUDS training. My husband had wanted to apply for the job, but was too high ranking to do so (they only took E4-E5). However, that the program was recently discontinued. Below I have listed a few of the extra duty jobs that have been around for years with no threat to being discontinued. Most of these jobs require specilty schools (Called C schools) or unit level training. If you have a question about the below jobs, or a job that you think might be an extra one in the Coast Guard, please let me know and I will explain better or do some digging for you. Note: Law enforcement duties and an in depth look at LE extra duties will be covered later. List of Some of the Extra Duty Jobs in the Coast Guard Command Chief (essentially a middleman between enlisted and officers of each different unit) Boarding Team Member (like a deputy of the CG law enforcement world) Boarding Officer (like the Sheriff of the CG law enforcement world) CDAR (Command Drug and Alcohol Representative) Victim Advocate Recruiter Canine Teams Commandant’s Driver Coast Guard Honor Guard White House Cook (for Culinary Specialists in the CG) Company Commander (drill instructor) Diver Cutter rescue swimmer (NOT a rescue swimmer from a helicopter, which is an actual rate in the CG) Civil Rights Advisor How to Advance Advancing in the Coast Guard is also an ever changing process, but the basis remains the same. For Officers it is a resume type process. But for enlisted it is completely different. Officer advancement is different from enlisted advancements, and based mostly on a resume type process (known in the Coast Guard as OER) and job performance. This website below lays out the process in which an officer advances through the ranks. https://www.gocoastguard.com/active-duty-careers/officer-opportunities/advance-through-training "Go above and beyond what is expected of you, and you will be rewarded with a promotion. Promotions include better pay and assignments with more responsibility. Our promotion system does not favor any one-career specialty over another. Commissioned officer selection boards convene at least once a year to review candidates and ensure that sufficient officer flow exists to meet service needs. Officers at the rank of ensign (O-1) and lieutenant junior grade (O-2) are evaluated bi-annually and lieutenant (O-3) and above are evaluated annually by their supervisors via an officer evaluation report (OER). This is the most important performance dimension in assessing readiness for greater responsibility. Officers selected for promotion will have demonstrated the leadership traits, core values (honor, respect, devotion to duty) and performance that confirm their potential to serve in positions of increased responsibility. Consideration for promotion is typically based on defined time frames so that qualified candidates can gain sufficient experience while earning increased responsibility." Enlisted advancement is a competitive field which is designed to be fair to anyone who competes, and promote those who are the best and most developed in their fields. The first step in the process is getting a list of tasks (rating performance qualifications) signed off by someone of that rank in your rate. Example: A Chief Electricians Mate would sign off the rating performance qualifications for a Petty Officer First Class Electrician who is trying to make Chief. These tasks prove that you have the necessary knowledge and skills to do the job of the pay grade higher than you. After these tasks are completed, the member will get the endorsement of their chain of command to go forward in the advancement process. After which they will be able to take a yearly/semi yearly test called a Service Wide Test (Chief and higher can take the yearly test, everyone else is semi-yearly). This test will rank them according to their test score. After their scores are tallied and they are ranked, headquarters will look at each individual’s career history, and rescore them with award points. Award points are given for various accomplishments: medals they have won, time they have been in the Coast Guard, and any extra jobs or accomplishments they have done that earns points. These points are then added to the test score and everyone on the list is re-ranked. So someone who takes a good test, but is otherwise not an outstanding Coast Guardsman could be bumped to the bottom of the list. Likewise, an outstanding Coast Guardsman who is not good at taking tests can be elevated to the top of the list with enough award points. These ranks are then released annually/semi-annually, and a few weeks/months later headquarters will release an approximate ‘cut’ of how many advancements they project to make that year I.E. out of the 200 who competed, they plan to advance 25 of them. This lets the Coast Guardsman know if they will be advancing that year (depending on what number they are on the list), or if they need to compete again. Cuts can happen every few months if enough people are advanced, discharged, or retired to allow headquarters to advance more than the initially anticipated amount of people. Since these cuts are projected numbers, each month headquarters releases a list of actual numbers/people who will advance that month from the initial ranked list of candidates. This continues each month until all (or more) are made from the cut(s). Example: In December that 25th person from the ranked list was officially advanced, and possibly an additional 1+ people if there ended up being extra advancements/retirements/discharged from people higher up the rank structure Did I confuse you? Homework: Email or post any questions or concerns you had throughout the class. Cheers, Dawn Luedecke
0
0
13
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 10, 2018
In Lesson 5: Enlisted
Note: Coast Guard is similar to the Navy with regard to many things. Including Insignias and some jobs. However, each rate will have a different rate badge in place of where the cross anchors are in the picture above. Example: How does this all work? All enlisted personnel start out as an E-1 (seaman recruit) at boot camp. Upon graduation, they are automatically promoted to E-2 or possibly E-3 depending on their background and agreement with their recruiter. Most people go through the 8-week boot camp program. However, someone who is essentially transferring over from another military organization, police dept, etc. can go to a boot camp class called DEPOT, which is a condensed 2-week boot camp program, and they will graduate as an E-3. Upon graduation most personnel (whether boot camp or DEPOT) will go out to the fleet. However, many people sign up for a rating class with their recruiter, and will go directly from boot camp to their rating school called “A school,” where they will learn their chosen profession. Upon graduation of A school they will be an E-4 or Petty Officer Third Class. However, unlike the rest of the military organizations, The Coast Guard allows members to come in and ‘try out’ various jobs before deciding on which one they want to do. These members are considered Non-rates or Seaman Apprentice (E-2)/Seaman (E-3). Once they decide which job they want, then they will go to A school and continue to advance. Here is a breakdown of the terminology for each rank. Note: After boot camp graduation, a person gets a job in two areas at a unit: the deck department or a position outside the engine room on the boat/unit (known as seaman), or they will be in the engineer department or a position working in the engine room (known as firemen). E-1 - Seaman Recruit E-2 - Seaman/Firemen Apprentice E-3 - Seaman/Firemen E-4 - Petty Officer Third Class E-5 - Petty Officer Second Class E-6 - Petty Officer First Class E-7 - Chief Petty Officer E-8 - Senior Chief Petty Officer E-9 - Master Chief Petty Officer E-10 -Master Chief Petty Officer of the CG (only 1 person will have this rank at a time) *Note: How to advance will be covered later along with extra duty jobs that Coasties do in addition to their main job in the CG* Enlisted Jobs Available Click below for a detailed explanation of all the ratings (jobs) available at A school, including guides to the kinds of jobs the training can lead to in the civilian world. This information can be found at: https://www.gocoastguard.com/active-duty-careers/enlisted-opportunities Aviation Maintenance Technician AMTs are responsible for maintaining and crewing CG aircraft. The technical training and experience they obtain replicates that of various occupations in commercial aviation. Aviation Survival Technician The duties of ASTs include saving lives, providing emergency medical support, and maintaining the survival equipment their shipmates depend upon in emergencies. Avionics Electrical Technician AETs troubleshoot and repair complex avionics and electrical systems on assigned aircraft. Boatswain's Mate Are you looking for a real hands-on seagoing experience? Boatswains mate may be the experience for which you are looking. Culinary Specialist Learn about the various aspects of the restaurant or catering industry while serving your country. Damage Controlman DCs are the Coast Guard's maintenance and emergency repair specialists. Electrician's Mate Electricity is the lifeline of any system, and EMs are the ones the Coast Guard counts on most to keep it all connected and running. Electronics Technician ETs are in charge of maintaining virtually all of the Coast Guard's electronics systems from navigation systems to command, control and communication (C3) systems. Gunner's Mate For those interested in the technical inner-workings of small arms, weapon systems, and pyrotechnics, becoming a gunner's mate can provide the opportunity to learn all there is to know. Health Services Technician Do you want to learn hands-on medical skills? Do you want to save lives? These technicians care for individuals in distress or life-threatening situations. Information Systems Technician ITs manage all of the critical information data in the Coast Guard. Intelligence Specialist With the Coast Guard taking an increasingly larger role in homeland security, we've established a new and vitally important rating, intelligence specialist (IS). As an IS, you will be one of the first defenders of our ports and waterways. Machinery Technician MKs maintain engineering systems at virtually every Coast Guard unit and actively participate in operational missions. Technical training and experience obtained are comparable with occupations in commercial engineering and law enforcement fields. Marine Science Technician Do you want to get out there and help save and protect the environment? Maritime Enforcement Specialist Protecting America's ports, waterways, and interests at home and abroad. Maritime Enforcement Specialists are trained in Maritime Law Enforcement, Anti-terrorism, Force Protection, and Physical Security. Operations Specialist As an Operations Specialist (OS) you will play a central role in protecting the public from all maritime threats and hazards through command and control of boats, cutters, aircraft and personnel. Working from the nerve center where all major operational plans and decisions are made, you will develop search and rescue plans to save mariners in danger, oversee law enforcement operations, and gather and apply intelligence information while operating the most advanced tactical computer systems in the Coast Guard. Public Affairs Specialist If you have an interest in photography, writing and crisis communications, you could be the main link between the Coast Guard and the public. Storekeeper Good with numbers? Managing money? Apply your skills to help serve the Coast Guard. Yeoman As with any large organization, good human resources management is vital to the Coast Guard.
               Enlisted Rates and Ranks content media
0
0
17
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 09, 2018
In Lesson 4: Officers
Officer Base Pay Here is a chart with all military ranks and pay. Everything from W2 to O10 is an officer. Please check it out so you can see what I'm talking about below. *Note: The pictures in the federalpay link below are of the shoulder boards each officer wears to signify their rank.* https://www.federalpay.org/military/coast-guard/ranks Being an officer in the Coast Guard isn’t as cut and dry as many think it is. There are many ways to become a commissioned officer in the CG. Including: Warrant Officer, Officer Candidate School, the College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative (CSPI), direct commissioning, and the Coast Guard Academy. Most of the Coast Guard officers have either gone through the Academy, OCS, or are Warrant Officers. As they advance through the ranks there are less and less jobs available, making it a competative advancement, and leading up to the highest rank of Admiral (an extremely hard rank to achieve). Side Note: How Important is doing research for your books? Take for example a NYT Bestseller’s novel (not to be named) where a 30-40 yr old hero is given (and I stress given) a job that a 60+ year old man in the Coast Guard typically gets. In the Coast Guard, there have only been 21-4 star admirals throughout history. One of the worst books I’ve read where the Coast Guard was butchered was where the hero (a 30-40yo retired Navy Seal) did one unauthorized rescue with a Coast Guard crew (which would have landed them all in the brig, including the hero, btw), but instead the hero was automatically given a job as an Admiral in the Coast Guard. The promotion was given to the hero by a Chief (E7) in the Coast Guard who oversaw a station (if you remember from week 1 that is one of the smallest units we have). And without even having to go through boot camp, the Academy, or any other sort of transitional program the Coast Guard has. This unauthorized advancement was in addition to a plethora of other insulting misconceptions about the CG. *I was appalled at the lack of even basic research done by the author, agent, and big five editor* With a simple web search I was able to find this below webpage that outlines the top job available in the Coast Guard, and how to get it. So here is why this book was so insulting…remember our hero is a 30-40 yo retired Navy Seal (typically, the Navy Seals that I’ve met were E4-E7 with only a few officers in their ranks), and our hero was given a promotion to Admiral by a CG Chief at a station: “Promotion to Admiral is initiated with nomination of a candidate by the President of the United States (not a Chief/E7) from active Rear Admirals, the lower half and upper halves. Nomination is based on recommendations provided by senior Coast Guard officials and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. After nomination by the President, candidates must be approved by the U.S. Senate by majority vote before being approved for promotion upon assumption of their new duties. Four-star flag officers generally serve for a tour of three to four years, and a variety of mandates apply to admirals' retirement from the Coast Guard. • Four-star officers must retire after 40 years of total service unless recommissioned • All flag officers must retire one month after their 64th birthday • Flag officers can have their retirement deferred to their 66th birthday by the Secretary of Defense, and to their 68th birthday by the President • Once a four-star admiral's tour has ended, he has 60 days to be reappointed or promoted before they must retire.” https://www.military-ranks.org/coast-guard/admiral It is extremely important that no matter where you are in your career you do even basic research. Which is why I’m so glad you all have decided to take this class. While I know that in my historical research, I probably do get some things wrong, but I at least do basic research. But I digress… How to become an officer in the Coast Guard Let’s get back to how your hero could go from civilian to Admiral. (Just remember, those admirals are not young heroes). So here are different ways a person can get a commission in the Coast Guard. Warrant Officer Warrant officers are enlisted personnel who came up the ranks, and successfully competed for a commission to officer through a (complicated military style) resume/interview process. These jobs are given out depending upon the applicants job history, performance throughout their career, and what job they did in the Coast Guard (i.e. Engineer, Boatswains Mate, Gunners Mate, etc). A Warrant Officer can continue to advance from W2, W3, W4 to O4, O5, O6 and so on. They are never Ensigns or Lieutenant Junior Grades. Officer Candidate School The Officer Candidate School is precommissioning training for college graduates who want to become Coast Guard officers. Often times professionally developed enlisted personal will go through OCS to become an officer. Candidates attend officer training course in New London, CT. The physical and academic curriculum is demanding. In addition to physical training, candidates study navigation, ship’s operations, seamanship, Coast Guard orientation and leadership. Upon completion, candidates are commissioned as Ensigns. The College Student Pre-Commissioning Initiative (CSPI) is a scholarship program for college sophomores. So essentially college kids who want to join the Coast Guard can do this CSPI (pronounced sea-spy by Coasties). This program provides students with valuable leadership, management, law enforcement, navigation and marine science skills and training. It also provides full payment of school tuition, fees (that are approved), some or all of textbook costs, a salary, medical insurance and other benefits during a student's junior and senior year of college. The CSPI program guarantees training at Officer Candidate School (OCS) upon successful completion of all program requirements. (Which includes going through enlisted boot camp, and then OCS) Each student is expected to complete his/her degree and all Coast Guard training requirements. Following the completion of OCS and commission as a Coast Guard officer, each student will be required to serve on active duty (full time) as an officer for 3 years. Starting out as an Ensign the Lieutenant Junior Grade, and so on. Direct Commissions (Keyword: Reserve which means not Active Duty) Graduates from a law school accredited by the American Bar Association are eligible to receive commissions as Lieutenant Junior Grade in the Coast Guard Reserve. The applicant must be admitted to the bar of a state or federal court within one year of receiving a commission. Qualified graduates of state and federal maritime academies may also be eligible for a commission as an Ensign or Lieutenant Junior Grade in the Coast Guard Reserve. Engineers are highly sought and may be directly commissioned up to the rank of Lieutenant. Occasionally, direct commissions may be available for ROTC students at selected colleges and universities, previous military officers and qualified military pilots. Qualified military pilots may compete for direct commissions as aviators in the rank of Ensign or Lieutenant Junior Grade in the Coast Guard Reserve. The U.S. Coast Guard Academy The U.S. Coast Guard Academy, located in New London, Connecticut, accepts about 250 young men and women each year. The four-year academic program leads to a bachelor of science degree in a variety of majors. Approximately 75 percent of the academy graduates earn degrees in technical areas such as engineering, sciences and mathematics. Each major provides a sound undergraduate education in a field of interest to the Coast Guard and prepares the cadet to assume initial duty as a junior officer (starting with Ensign and then Lieutenant Junior Grade, and so on). A large majority of officers have graduated from the Coast Guard academy or OCS. Upon graduation, each coastie/cadet is distributed throughout the fleet, and often tries out different jobs. Academy officers are never considered Warrant Officers. Here is a quick list of the degree programs available through the CG Academy. Coast Guard Academy Academic Majors (https://www.uscga.edu/aboutcga/) The U.S. Coast Guard Academy offers nine academic majors. All cadets pursue a liberal arts-based core curriculum, providing a broad academic foundation to complement the specialized learning within each major. CIVIL ENGINEERING The Civil Engineering program prepares future officers to design, build, operate and maintain structures and systems that help the Coast Guard work and solve real world problems. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING Electrical Engineering is a cutting-edge major that prepares future officers for exciting careers with a focus on addressing critical technological needs. CYBER SYSTEMS The major prepares future officers to defend against cyber attacks, protect information and systems, and deter crime. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING The Mechanical Engineering major develops each student’s ability to apply scientific principles in the design and analysis of mechanical and energy/power systems. NAVAL ARCHITECTURE AND MARINE ENGINEERING The NA&ME major provides a strong foundation in engineering, mathematics and the sciences, focused on the design, operation and repair of ships and boats. OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND COMPUTER ANALYSIS The ORCA major emphasizes the practical application of mathematics, statistics and computer techniques to analyze complex issues and provide informed solutions. MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The MES major integrates oceanography, chemistry and biology to study the complex relationships between humans and the land, oceans and atmosphere. MANAGEMENT The Management major educates students in the broad array of functional skills and analytical processes required of today's leaders and managers. GOVERNMENT The government major develops leaders who can think critically about political systems and societies and understand their cultural, historical and theoretical underpinnings. So essentially there are several ways in which to become and officer in the Coast Guard. Officers here are typically not as active into the actual missions as they are in other military organizations. You may have the occasional officer who goes above and beyond their normal duties to do extra duties (extra duties will be outlined on friday), but those officers are rare. A typical officer is involved more in the politics of the unit and Coast Guard in general. The work horses and doers of the Coast Guard are typically enlisted. Homework: Post or email me any questions you may have about officers in the Coast Guard.
0
0
16
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 06, 2018
In Lesson 3: Uniforms
NOTE: Operational Dress Uniforms will be changing in 18 months, however, I was informed that I could not release the new uniform information yet as they are not completely finalized. Once I can, I will send you all and email with the updated Operational Dress Uniforms. Uniform manual: https://media.defense.gov/2018/Dec/13/2002072299/-1/-1/0/CIM_1020_6J.PDF I have attached the link to the Coast Guard manual for uniforms. This manual is very in depth because it is designed to instruct Coast Guardsman on the proper way to wear uniforms and uniform items, so I’m going to give you a few points. 1. The most used uniforms in the Coast Guard are Operational Dress Uniform (ODU), Tropical Blue Long (Trops), and Bravos (Dress uniform). 2. The dinner and white dress uniforms are rarely used except by officers in Washington DC or during weddings and ceremonies. And only officers and occasionally Chiefs wear them. 3. Campaign covers are worn only by drill instructors at boot camp If your hero or heroine is out on the water working with the public, chances are he/she will be in ODU’s, unless in a war zone. Coasties oversees in war zones typically wear the uniform designated for that region (i.e. camouflaged ODU/BDUs similar to the Navy or Army, depending on region) Example 1: Typical Operational Dress Uniform (ODU)- *Note: During the summer the sleeves are warn rolled up as pictured in the BDU dessert uniform. During the winter the sleeves are warn down as pictured in this ODU uniform.* Example 2: Battle Dress Uniforms (BDU) warn when a Coast Guardsman goes into war zones. The manual does show you things like uniform regulations, hair style regulations, and more. This is a public knowledge manual. Pages 3-55 through 3-56 shows when each uniform is to be warn, and the equivalent uniform in other military branches. Please feel free to look throught the manual, and let me know if you have any questions. *Note: While performing rescues and law enforcement, the Coasties will also wear survivor gear such as bullet proof vests, wetsuits, dry suits, life vests, float jackets, helmets, etc. These are covered in a different class* Homework: When you’re done looking through the manual, see if you can match up the uniform to the name. Type your answers in the comments.
Uniforms content media
0
0
20
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 03, 2018
In Lesson 2: Missions
The Coast Guard performs 11 official missions. However, the Coast Guard has a vast role within these missions. Anywhere from hurricane/natural disaster response, to military asset escorts, cleaning oil off wildlife, and even law enforcement and war time support overseas in Bahrain. Because the organization is roughly the size of the New York City Police Department, many of the mission overlap, and personal are required to perform more than one job at a time. Often times, the Coast Guard will be doing: law enforcement, security, and search and rescue simultaneously. This information can be found at https://www.gocoastguard.com/about-the-coast-guard/discover-our-roles-missions Official Missions: Port & Waterway Security Security Along with search and rescue, port and waterway security is the Coast Guard’s primary homeland security mission. Coast Guard members protect marine resources and maritime commerce, as well as those who live, work, or recreate on the water. Port and waterway security also involves prevention of terrorist attacks and response when terrorist acts do occur. Counter-terrorism preparedness and response operations all fall within the scope of port and waterway security. Anti-Terrorism & Counter-Terrorism Defeating terrorism requires an integrated, comprehensive approach that maximizes effectiveness without duplicating efforts, which is why the Coast Guard maintains law enforcement teams dedicated to fighting terrorism on our waters. Maritime law enforcement teams serve as a tactical resource with advanced counter-terrorism skills. Teams are trained to seek out and stop potential terrorist activity before it can be initiated. These anti-terrorism experts enforce security zones, conduct law enforcement boardings, ensure maritime security, augment shoreside security at waterfront facilities, and detect weapons of mass destruction. Drug Interdiction The Coast Guard is the nation's first line of defense against drug smugglers seeking to bring illegal substances into the United States. The Coast Guard coordinates closely with other federal agencies and countries within a vast six million square-mile region to disrupt and deter the flow of illegal drugs. Coast Guard drug interdiction accounts for more than half of all U.S. government seizures of cocaine each year. Aids to Navigation One important mission entrusted to the Coast Guard is the care and maintenance of maritime aids to navigation. Much like drivers need stoplights, street signs, and universally accepted driving rules, boaters also need equivalent nautical ‘rules of the road.’ The Coast Guard is responsible for ensuring this network of signs, symbols, buoys, markers, light houses, and regulations is up to date and functioning properly so recreational and commercial boaters can safely navigate the maritime environment. Search & Rescue Search and rescue (SAR) is one of the Coast Guard's oldest missions. Warding off the loss of life, personal injury, and property damage by helping boaters in distress has always been a top Coast Guard priority. Coast Guard SAR response involves multi-mission stations, cutters, aircraft, and boats linked by communications networks. The Coast Guard is recognized as a leader in the field of search and rescue. To meet this responsibility, the Coast Guard maintains SAR facilities on the East, West and Gulf coasts, as well as in Alaska, Hawaii, Guam, and Puerto Rico, and on the Great Lakes and inland waterways. Living Marine Resources The nation’s waterways and marine ecosystems are vital to the country’s economy and health. Ensuring America enjoys a rich, diverse and sustainable ocean environment is an important Coast Guard mission. This includes ensuring the country’s protected marine species are provided the protection necessary to help their populations recover to healthy, sustainable levels. The Coast Guard is a federal agency that protects our ocean environment and the marine life that inhabits it by enforcing domestic and international fisheries laws, as well as protects the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) from foreign encroachment. The U.S. EEZ is the largest in the world, comprising 3.4 million square miles of ocean and more than 90,000 miles of coastline. Keeping these waters clean and safe is critical to both our nation’s economy and its environment. Marine Safety While search and rescue is one of the Coast Guard's most well-known missions, crews do much more than save mariners in peril. Promoting safe boating practices is a key objective to help prevent an incident at sea. The Coast Guard investigates maritime accidents, merchant vessels, offshore drilling units, and marine facilities. Additionally, the Coast Guard is responsible for licensing mariners, documenting U.S. flagged vessels, and implementing a variety of safety programs. Despite our best efforts, mariners sometimes find themselves in harm's way. When they do, the Coast Guard has a proud tradition of immediate response to save lives and property in peril. To be part of our search and rescue team, it takes more than physical ability. You'll also need that special desire and bravery with which heroes are born. As a leading U.S. representative to the International Maritime Organization, a part of the United Nations, the Coast Guard is the driving force behind shipping safety, pollution prevention, and mariner training and certification standards. Commercial vessels are not the only boats on the water - more than 76 million recreational boaters share this space as well. Our 35,000-person civilian volunteer branch called the Coast Guard Auxiliary plays a central role in recreational boating safety providing recreational boat inspections and teaching life jacket safety across the country. Coast Guard activities in support of maritime safety are inseparable from those we perform to protect the marine environment and economic waterways. The integration of stewardship, safety and security has saved many lives and helped secure our national security. Defense Readiness In our post-9/11 society, national security interests can no longer be defined solely in terms of direct military threats to America and its allies. The Coast Guard’s role in national defense and anti-terrorism is a cornerstone of homeland security efforts to protect the country from the ever-present threat of terrorism. The Coast Guard has four major national defense missions: maritime intercept operations, deployed port operations/security and defense, peacetime engagement, and environmental defense operations. These missions are essential military tasks assigned to the Coast Guard as a component of joint and combined forces in peacetime, crisis, and war. A Joint Maritime Military Throughout its distinguished history, the Coast Guard has enjoyed a unique relationship with the Department of the Navy. By statute, the Coast Guard is an armed force operating in the joint arena at any time and functioning as a specialized service under the Navy in time of war or when directed by the President. The Coast Guard also has command responsibilities for the U.S. Maritime Defense Zone, countering potential threats to America's coasts, ports, and inland waterways through numerous port-security, harbor-defense, and coastal-warfare operations and exercises. Migrant Interdiction Thousands of people try to enter this country illegally every year by sea, many via highly dangerous and illegal smuggling operations. Intercepting these offenders at sea means they can be safely returned to their country of origin without the costly processes required if they had successfully entered the United States. As the United States' primary maritime law enforcement agency, the Coast Guard enforces immigration laws at sea. The Coast Guard conducts patrols and coordinates with federal agencies and foreign countries to detain undocumented migrants at sea and prohibit entry via maritime routes to the United States and its territories. Illegal immigration can cost taxpayers billions of dollars each year in social services. In addition to relieving this financial burden on our citizens, the Coast Guard's efforts help to support legal migration systems. Primarily, the Coast Guard maintains its humanitarian responsibility to prevent the loss of life at sea, since the majority of migrant vessels are dangerously overloaded, unseaworthy or otherwise unsafe. Marine Environmental Protection Protecting the delicate ecosystem of our oceans is a vital Coast Guard mission. The Coast Guard works with a variety of groups and organizations to ensure the livelihood of endangered marine species. Through the Marine Environmental Protection program, the Coast Guard develops and enforces regulations to avert the introduction of invasive species into the maritime environment, stop unauthorized ocean dumping, and prevent oil and chemical spills. Ice Operations Frigid, sub-zero temperatures heighten the dangers for any operation. Adding hazardous icy waters and icebergs makes for treacherous conditions for maritime commerce. To facilitate safe maritime commerce in icy waters and to protect communities in emergency situations, the Coast Guard conducts ice breaking operations in the Great Lakes and Northeast regions. Beyond domestic operations, the Coast Guard operates the only U.S.-flagged heavy icebreakers capable of providing year-round access to the Polar regions. Law Enforcement In addition to assisting other government agencies in multi-agency operations, the Coast Guard is essential in preventing illegal foreign fishing vessels from encroaching on the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is a priority for the Coast Guard. Protecting the integrity of the nation’s maritime borders and ensuring the health of U.S. fisheries is a vital part of the Coast Guard mission. The Coast Guard also enforces international agreements to suppress illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing activity in international waters. Homework: After reading the mission descriptions below, post a quick plot/subplot point you could use in your WIP, or a question about the Coast Guard that you might encounter while writing. Comment on each others posts as desired.
0
0
16
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 01, 2018
In Lesson 1: Structure
*Because of operational security reasons, I can only give information that is open to the public. However, many people don't know where to look for this information, or how to break it down. For this class, the information on organization can be found at www.uscg.mil.* "The Coast Guard is one of our nation's five military services. They exist to defend and preserve the United States. They protect the personal safety and security of the American people as well as: the marine transportation system and infrastructure, our nations natural and economic resources, and the territorial integrity of our nation–from both internal and external threats whether natural and man-made. They protect these interests in U.S. ports and inland waterways, along the coasts, and in international waters. They are a military, multi-mission, maritime force offering a unique blend of military, law enforcement, humanitarian, regulatory, and diplomatic capabilities. These capabilities underpin their three broad roles: maritime safety, maritime security, and maritime stewardship." So what does this mean? This means the Coast Guard does many jobs that most people don’t realize. In addition to search and rescue, they are the law enforcement on the water. Ensuring and enforcing the rules set by congress, and frequently working with other agencies for things such as: drug interdiction/trafficking (human, drugs, weapons, etc), migrant operations, fisheries enforcement, and smaller things such as intercepting drunken boaters. They help the EPA regulate environmental rules by checking tankers and helping to balance the marine ecosystem by enforcing fisheries regulations. They provide and maintain navigational tools for mariners such as: bouys, beacons, lighthouses, and markers (and in the past they maintained LORAN towers for those old school navigational mariners…but that is a moot point now). They perform humanitarian missions such as: clean ups after oil spill, natural disasters, and other environmental incidences. They perform diplomatic missions such as bringing water, food, and provisions to countries and islands affected by hurricanes and other natural disasters. They also frequently stand guard for politicians and diplomats who are on the move near waterways. During the tragic events of 911, the Coast Guard was one of the first to respond. I, myself, was standing at the tailor shop in boot camp watching the planes hit on a small television that the civilian workers had brought in so they could watch and work. I stood still, eyes not ‘in the boat’ (eyes front), as I snuck a peek at the second plane hitting the towers. Knowing that I would be involved in protecting the country during the war that would inevitably follow. Upon seeing the news, Air Station Cape Cod immediately launched helicopters to fly to New York City to perform mid-air rescues, the Coast Guard cutters were some of the first on scene to move survivors off the island, and Coast Guardsmen were on the frontline helping to direct survivors toward the appropriate rescue boats. Here is an amazing article to read to know exactly what sort of missions we performed during that fateful day. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-helvarg/the-coast-guard-heroes-of_b_710581.html ~In the old days, the Coast Guard's motto was: You have to go out, but you don't have to come back. Although now they stress safety first~ So what does this all mean for Coast Guard families? It means knowing that when something happens on the water or shorelines, the families will send their military members out (and often evacuate from natural disasters alone without their CG member) while knowing their member may not return. They send out their mothers or fathers to sail into the middle of hurricane in order to do rescue missions for those boaters who have gotten caught in the middle. They send their spouses to the middle east to perform law enforcement missions where suicide bombers have been known to target boats (and on occasion kill the Coast Guard boat crews). Families watch their coasties go out on helicopters to repel down and rescue survivors stranded on roof tops after natural disasters, or to send their law enforcement crews out (sometimes armed with only pepper spray and a baton) in order to enforce maritime laws. Although many Coast Guard members haven’t seen battle, the work they do on the water with search and rescue and law enforcement is enough to give many members PTSD. Each unit works and reports to another to make this organization a well oiled machine. Click below for a Keynote presentation which breakdowns the structure of the Coast Guard. Those of you who do not have a mac should be able to see each individual slide. Please tell me if its not working and I can email you the slides. Homework: Since this is a sort of complicated layout, we'll keep it simple. Comment on this forum with any questions or concerns about the structure. Cheers, Dawn
Lesson 1: Intro to USCG & Structure content media
0
0
72
Dawn Luedecke
Jul 01, 2018
In Introduction and Rules
Lessons will be posted by the end of each day in the Class forum page. Be Nice Ask Questions or comment as you please, but you must become a member (top right corner) to post on the forum. I will also respond via email if you wish to communicate that way instead. Enjoy :)
0
0
41